Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Postoperative brain volumes are associated with one-year neurodevelopmental outcome in children with severe congenital heart disease


Meuwly, Eliane; Feldmann, Maria; Knirsch, Walter; von Rhein, Michael; Payette, Kelly; Dave, Hitendu; Tuura, Ruth O' Gorman; Kottke, Raimund; Hagmann, Cornelia; Latal, Beatrice; Jakab, András; Research Group Heart and Brain* (2019). Postoperative brain volumes are associated with one-year neurodevelopmental outcome in children with severe congenital heart disease. Scientific Reports, 9:10885.

Abstract

Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) remain at risk for neurodevelopmental impairment despite improved perioperative care. Our prospective cohort study aimed to determine the relationship between perioperative brain volumes and neurodevelopmental outcome in neonates with severe CHD. Pre- and postoperative cerebral MRI was acquired in term born neonates with CHD undergoing neonatal cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Brain volumes were measured using an atlas prior-based automated method. One-year neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed with the Bayley-III. CHD infants (n = 77) had lower pre- and postoperative total and regional brain volumes compared to controls (n = 44, all p < 0.01). CHD infants had poorer cognitive and motor outcome (p ≤ 0.0001) and a trend towards lower language composite score compared to controls (p = 0.06). Larger total and selected regional postoperative brain volumes were found to be associated with better cognitive and language outcomes (all p < 0.04) at one year. This association was independent of length of intensive care unit stay for total, cortical, temporal, frontal and cerebellar volumes. Therefore, reduced cerebral volume in CHD neonates undergoing bypass surgery may serve as a biomarker for impaired outcome.

Abstract

Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) remain at risk for neurodevelopmental impairment despite improved perioperative care. Our prospective cohort study aimed to determine the relationship between perioperative brain volumes and neurodevelopmental outcome in neonates with severe CHD. Pre- and postoperative cerebral MRI was acquired in term born neonates with CHD undergoing neonatal cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Brain volumes were measured using an atlas prior-based automated method. One-year neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed with the Bayley-III. CHD infants (n = 77) had lower pre- and postoperative total and regional brain volumes compared to controls (n = 44, all p < 0.01). CHD infants had poorer cognitive and motor outcome (p ≤ 0.0001) and a trend towards lower language composite score compared to controls (p = 0.06). Larger total and selected regional postoperative brain volumes were found to be associated with better cognitive and language outcomes (all p < 0.04) at one year. This association was independent of length of intensive care unit stay for total, cortical, temporal, frontal and cerebellar volumes. Therefore, reduced cerebral volume in CHD neonates undergoing bypass surgery may serve as a biomarker for impaired outcome.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

28 downloads since deposited on 16 Aug 2019
28 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Vascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:26 July 2019
Deposited On:16 Aug 2019 12:19
Last Modified:04 Mar 2020 16:30
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-47328-9
PubMed ID:31350426

Download

Gold Open Access

Download PDF  'Postoperative brain volumes are associated with one-year neurodevelopmental outcome in children with severe congenital heart disease'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)