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Assimilation or social mobility? Explaining ethnic boundary crossing between the Ecuadorian 2001 and 2010 census


Strijbis, Oliver (2019). Assimilation or social mobility? Explaining ethnic boundary crossing between the Ecuadorian 2001 and 2010 census. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 42(12):2027-2046.

Abstract

Individual ethnic boundary crossing, i.e. the change in the ethnic category of an individual, is one of the elementary strategies of ethnic boundary making. The large bulk of the empirical literature so far has shown that ethnic categorization is correlated with cultural and economic attributes of the individuals. However, few empirical studies are able to investigate individual boundary crossing. This article adds to this literature by studying ethnic boundary crossing between 2001 and 2010 with a panel of about 340,000 Ecuadorians. It is shown that while ethnic boundary crossing is common, the overwhelming majority of crossings were made from or to mixed categories. In order to explain these boundary crossings, I test a cultural assimilation and an economic “money whitens” hypothesis. I find evidence for both explanations with cultural assimilation having a much stronger effect on ethnic categorization.

Abstract

Individual ethnic boundary crossing, i.e. the change in the ethnic category of an individual, is one of the elementary strategies of ethnic boundary making. The large bulk of the empirical literature so far has shown that ethnic categorization is correlated with cultural and economic attributes of the individuals. However, few empirical studies are able to investigate individual boundary crossing. This article adds to this literature by studying ethnic boundary crossing between 2001 and 2010 with a panel of about 340,000 Ecuadorians. It is shown that while ethnic boundary crossing is common, the overwhelming majority of crossings were made from or to mixed categories. In order to explain these boundary crossings, I test a cultural assimilation and an economic “money whitens” hypothesis. I find evidence for both explanations with cultural assimilation having a much stronger effect on ethnic categorization.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Political Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Political science
Uncontrolled Keywords:cultural studies, sociology and political science, anthropology, ethnicity, boundary making, assimilation, class, census, panel
Language:English
Date:2019
Deposited On:07 Aug 2019 12:55
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:41
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0141-9870
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2018.1518535

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