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Performance analysis of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation on blood flow hemodynamics: An optical imaging-based in vitro study


Gülan, Utku; Appa, Harish; Corso, Pascal; Templin, Christian; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Zilla, Peter; Duru, Firat; Holzner, Markus (2019). Performance analysis of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation on blood flow hemodynamics: An optical imaging-based in vitro study. Artificial Organs, 43(10):E282-E293.

Abstract

Cardiac implants may have a strong influence on the hemodynamics of the circulatory system. In this study, we aimed at investigating the impact of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices on blood flow patterns that develop in the ascending aorta under physiological flow conditions in vitro. For this purpose, a noninvasive optical measurement tool, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV), was used in a realistic compliant silicone aortic model. The performance and the influence of two TAVIs and one surgical valve on the aortic flow were investigated. Our results showed that valve design and materials may have a distinct influence on relevant hemodynamic properties, namely kinetic energy, production of turbulence, and shear stresses in the ascending aorta. All properties varied considerably between the different valve models. We found that the total aortic regurgitation composed of the closing volume, transvalvular and paravalvular leakages varied for the three valves investigated. Furthermore, peak mean kinetic energy (MKE) ranged from 61 to 116 J/m , whereas peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) ranged from 23 to 36 J/m . The analysis of shear showed that all the three studied devices had minimal overall risk for thrombus formation. We conclude that the characteristics and material designs of TAVI devices have strong influences on the hemodynamics in the ascending aorta.

Abstract

Cardiac implants may have a strong influence on the hemodynamics of the circulatory system. In this study, we aimed at investigating the impact of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices on blood flow patterns that develop in the ascending aorta under physiological flow conditions in vitro. For this purpose, a noninvasive optical measurement tool, three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV), was used in a realistic compliant silicone aortic model. The performance and the influence of two TAVIs and one surgical valve on the aortic flow were investigated. Our results showed that valve design and materials may have a distinct influence on relevant hemodynamic properties, namely kinetic energy, production of turbulence, and shear stresses in the ascending aorta. All properties varied considerably between the different valve models. We found that the total aortic regurgitation composed of the closing volume, transvalvular and paravalvular leakages varied for the three valves investigated. Furthermore, peak mean kinetic energy (MKE) ranged from 61 to 116 J/m , whereas peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) ranged from 23 to 36 J/m . The analysis of shear showed that all the three studied devices had minimal overall risk for thrombus formation. We conclude that the characteristics and material designs of TAVI devices have strong influences on the hemodynamics in the ascending aorta.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Bioengineering
Health Sciences > Medicine (miscellaneous)
Physical Sciences > Biomaterials
Physical Sciences > Biomedical Engineering
Language:English
Date:29 May 2019
Deposited On:18 Feb 2020 09:25
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 11:13
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0160-564X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/aor.13504
PubMed ID:31140632

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