Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Differences in initial training and wages of japanese engineering and retailing companies - Who pays for higher training costs?


Backes-Gellner, Uschi; Futagami, Shiho; Teuber, Silvia; Willi, Andrea (2013). Differences in initial training and wages of japanese engineering and retailing companies - Who pays for higher training costs? International Journal of Management Research and Business Strategy, 2(4):61-76.

Abstract

The optimal human resource and skill development strategy is one important factor of economic success. This paper, therefore, analyzes industry-specific differences in the training provision between engineering and retailing companies in Japan and focuses in particular on the initial training provision for intermediate skills at the firm level. Based on 11 in-depth interviews in the retailing and the engineering sector in Japan, we find that gross training costs per basic trainee are significantly higher in engineering than in retailing. However, not only the engineering companies, but also their employees bear higher costs than their counterparts in retailing. The absolute and relative entrance wages for production employees are significantly lower than the entrance wages of employees in sale. Even though wages in engineering increase significantly stronger within the first five years, the absolute and relative wages in engineering remain still significantly lower. The results relate to the qualification levels of new trainees and the career paths.

Abstract

The optimal human resource and skill development strategy is one important factor of economic success. This paper, therefore, analyzes industry-specific differences in the training provision between engineering and retailing companies in Japan and focuses in particular on the initial training provision for intermediate skills at the firm level. Based on 11 in-depth interviews in the retailing and the engineering sector in Japan, we find that gross training costs per basic trainee are significantly higher in engineering than in retailing. However, not only the engineering companies, but also their employees bear higher costs than their counterparts in retailing. The absolute and relative entrance wages for production employees are significantly lower than the entrance wages of employees in sale. Even though wages in engineering increase significantly stronger within the first five years, the absolute and relative wages in engineering remain still significantly lower. The results relate to the qualification levels of new trainees and the career paths.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 05 Sep 2019
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:30 October 2013
Deposited On:05 Sep 2019 08:05
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:43
Publisher:ijmrbs
ISSN:2319-345X
OA Status:Closed
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:10313

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members