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The Stakeholder View of Strategy (SHV): A Comprehensive Approach to Harmonize Public and Entrepreneurial Interaction


Sachs, Sybille; Rühli, Edwin (2009). The Stakeholder View of Strategy (SHV): A Comprehensive Approach to Harmonize Public and Entrepreneurial Interaction. In: Pechlaner, Harald; von Holzschuher, Wolf; Bachinger, Monika. Unternehmertum und Public Private Partnership. Wiesbaden: Gabler, 3-26.

Abstract

The meaning of firm’s role as a societal institution has gained increasing relevance as a result of globalization. Corporations have begun to manage the globalization processes, while political systems are still primarily oriented towards the idea of the nation state. The main duty of the nation states is to regulate and coordinate social issues within the framework of national boundaries; as their sphere of influence is limited to national boundaries they only limitedly engage in developing and realizing solutions for global problems. This gap is filled at least partially on the one hand by NGOs and supranational institutions like the UN. On the other hand, also the globally active multinational corporations are being increasingly challenged in their societal function. In the same vein Stiglitz (2006) claims for a reorientation of firms’ role in society in his new book on globalization: “One step in the right direction (note of the author: to improve corporate governance) would be to have companies take into account all stakeholders – employees and the communities in which they operate, not just their shareholders.

Abstract

The meaning of firm’s role as a societal institution has gained increasing relevance as a result of globalization. Corporations have begun to manage the globalization processes, while political systems are still primarily oriented towards the idea of the nation state. The main duty of the nation states is to regulate and coordinate social issues within the framework of national boundaries; as their sphere of influence is limited to national boundaries they only limitedly engage in developing and realizing solutions for global problems. This gap is filled at least partially on the one hand by NGOs and supranational institutions like the UN. On the other hand, also the globally active multinational corporations are being increasingly challenged in their societal function. In the same vein Stiglitz (2006) claims for a reorientation of firms’ role in society in his new book on globalization: “One step in the right direction (note of the author: to improve corporate governance) would be to have companies take into account all stakeholders – employees and the communities in which they operate, not just their shareholders.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:28 Aug 2019 12:48
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:43
Publisher:Gabler
ISBN:3-8349-1631-5
OA Status:Closed
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:4213

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