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Haptoglobin administration into the subarachnoid space prevents hemoglobin-induced cerebral vasospasm.


Abstract

Delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) is a major driver of adverse outcomes in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) defining an unmet need for therapeutic development. Cell-free hemoglobin that is released from erythrocytes into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suggested to cause vasoconstriction and neuronal toxicity and correlates with the occurrence of DIND. Cell-free hemoglobin in the CSF of patients with aSAH disrupted dilatory NO signaling ex vivo in cerebral arteries, which shifted vascular tone balance from dilation to constriction. We found that selective removal of hemoglobin from patient CSF with a haptoglobin-affinity column or its sequestration in a soluble hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex was sufficient to restore physiological vascular responses. In a sheep model, administration of haptoglobin into the CSF inhibited hemoglobin-induced cerebral vasospasm and preserved vascular NO-signaling. We identified two pathways of hemoglobin delocalization from CSF into the brain parenchyma and into the NO-sensitive compartment of small cerebral arteries. Both pathways were critical for hemoglobin-toxicity and were interrupted by the large hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex that inhibited spatial requirements for hemoglobin reactions with NO in tissues. Collectively, our data show that compartmentalization of hemoglobin by haptoglobin provides a novel framework for innovation aimed at reducing hemoglobin-driven neurological damage after subarachnoid bleeding.

Abstract

Delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) is a major driver of adverse outcomes in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) defining an unmet need for therapeutic development. Cell-free hemoglobin that is released from erythrocytes into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suggested to cause vasoconstriction and neuronal toxicity and correlates with the occurrence of DIND. Cell-free hemoglobin in the CSF of patients with aSAH disrupted dilatory NO signaling ex vivo in cerebral arteries, which shifted vascular tone balance from dilation to constriction. We found that selective removal of hemoglobin from patient CSF with a haptoglobin-affinity column or its sequestration in a soluble hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex was sufficient to restore physiological vascular responses. In a sheep model, administration of haptoglobin into the CSF inhibited hemoglobin-induced cerebral vasospasm and preserved vascular NO-signaling. We identified two pathways of hemoglobin delocalization from CSF into the brain parenchyma and into the NO-sensitive compartment of small cerebral arteries. Both pathways were critical for hemoglobin-toxicity and were interrupted by the large hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex that inhibited spatial requirements for hemoglobin reactions with NO in tissues. Collectively, our data show that compartmentalization of hemoglobin by haptoglobin provides a novel framework for innovation aimed at reducing hemoglobin-driven neurological damage after subarachnoid bleeding.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Intensive Care Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Medicine
Language:English
Date:22 October 2019
Deposited On:10 Sep 2019 13:51
Last Modified:11 May 2020 19:05
Publisher:American Society for Clinical Investigation
ISSN:0021-9738
OA Status:Green
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI130630
PubMed ID:31454333

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