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Associations between arterial stiffness and blood pressure fluctuations after spinal cord injury


Currie, Katharine D; Hubli, Michèle; MacDonald, Maureen J; Krassioukov, Andrei V (2019). Associations between arterial stiffness and blood pressure fluctuations after spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVE To examine the relationship between arterial stiffness and daily fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) owing to hypotensive events and autonomic dysreflexia (AD) in individuals with a T6 and above spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING University-based laboratory in Vancouver, BC, Canada. METHODS Twenty-six individuals (73% male; 43 (11) years) with a chronic (> 1 year post SCI), traumatic, motor-complete SCI with a neurological level of injury of C4-T6 participated in this study. Arterial stiffness was assessed using carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). BP was measured over a 24-hr period using ambulatory BP monitoring. AD was defined as an increase in systolic BP > 20 mmHg above baseline BP. Hypotensive events were defined as a decrease in systolic BP ≥ 20 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 10 mmHg below baseline. The severity and frequency of these events were quantified and Pearson and Spearman's correlations between them and cfPWV were performed. RESULTS AD severity and frequency were not were correlated with cfPWV. For hypotensive events, both the frequency (r = 0.412, P = 0.04) and severity (Δsystolic BP; r = -0.425, P = 0.03) of these events were correlated with cfPWV. The combined total of AD and hypotensive events (9 (5) events/day) was also correlated with cfPWV (r = 0.480, P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Hypotensive events, and the combined frequency of both hypo- and hypertensive events within a 24-hr period are associated with increased arterial stiffness in individuals with T6 and above SCI, suggesting BP instability may play a role in arterial stiffening post SCI.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVE To examine the relationship between arterial stiffness and daily fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) owing to hypotensive events and autonomic dysreflexia (AD) in individuals with a T6 and above spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING University-based laboratory in Vancouver, BC, Canada. METHODS Twenty-six individuals (73% male; 43 (11) years) with a chronic (> 1 year post SCI), traumatic, motor-complete SCI with a neurological level of injury of C4-T6 participated in this study. Arterial stiffness was assessed using carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). BP was measured over a 24-hr period using ambulatory BP monitoring. AD was defined as an increase in systolic BP > 20 mmHg above baseline BP. Hypotensive events were defined as a decrease in systolic BP ≥ 20 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 10 mmHg below baseline. The severity and frequency of these events were quantified and Pearson and Spearman's correlations between them and cfPWV were performed. RESULTS AD severity and frequency were not were correlated with cfPWV. For hypotensive events, both the frequency (r = 0.412, P = 0.04) and severity (Δsystolic BP; r = -0.425, P = 0.03) of these events were correlated with cfPWV. The combined total of AD and hypotensive events (9 (5) events/day) was also correlated with cfPWV (r = 0.480, P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Hypotensive events, and the combined frequency of both hypo- and hypertensive events within a 24-hr period are associated with increased arterial stiffness in individuals with T6 and above SCI, suggesting BP instability may play a role in arterial stiffening post SCI.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:19 June 2019
Deposited On:11 Sep 2019 13:32
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:45
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1362-4393
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41393-019-0316-y
PubMed ID:31217517

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