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MRI in traumatic spinal cord injury: from clinical assessment to neuroimaging biomarkers


Freund, Patrick; Seif, Maryam; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Friston, Karl; Fehlings, Michael G; Thompson, Alan J; Curt, Armin (2019). MRI in traumatic spinal cord injury: from clinical assessment to neuroimaging biomarkers. Lancet Neurology:Epub ahead.

Abstract

Traumatic spinal cord injury occurs when an external physical impact damages the spinal cord and leads to permanent neurological dysfunction and disability, and it is associated with a high socioeconomic burden. Conventional MRI plays a crucial role in the diagnostic workup as it reveals extrinsic compression of the spinal cord and disruption of the discoligamentous complex. Additionally, it can reveal macrostructural evidence of primary intramedullary damage such as haemorrhage, oedema, post-traumatic cystic cavities, and tissue bridges. Quantitative MRI, such as magnetisation transfer, magnetic resonance relaxation mapping, and diffusion imaging, enables the tracking of secondary changes across the neuraxis at the microstructural level. Both conventional MRI and quantitative MRI metrics, obtained early after spinal cord injury, are predictive of clinical outcome. Thus, neuroimaging biomarkers could serve as surrogate endpoints for more efficient future trials targeting acute and chronic spinal cord injury. The adoption of neuroimaging biomarkers in centres for spinal cord injury might lead to personalised patient care.

Abstract

Traumatic spinal cord injury occurs when an external physical impact damages the spinal cord and leads to permanent neurological dysfunction and disability, and it is associated with a high socioeconomic burden. Conventional MRI plays a crucial role in the diagnostic workup as it reveals extrinsic compression of the spinal cord and disruption of the discoligamentous complex. Additionally, it can reveal macrostructural evidence of primary intramedullary damage such as haemorrhage, oedema, post-traumatic cystic cavities, and tissue bridges. Quantitative MRI, such as magnetisation transfer, magnetic resonance relaxation mapping, and diffusion imaging, enables the tracking of secondary changes across the neuraxis at the microstructural level. Both conventional MRI and quantitative MRI metrics, obtained early after spinal cord injury, are predictive of clinical outcome. Thus, neuroimaging biomarkers could serve as surrogate endpoints for more efficient future trials targeting acute and chronic spinal cord injury. The adoption of neuroimaging biomarkers in centres for spinal cord injury might lead to personalised patient care.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:9 August 2019
Deposited On:11 Sep 2019 07:52
Last Modified:25 Sep 2019 00:45
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1474-4422
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(19)30138-3
PubMed ID:31405713

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