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Management of allergy transfer upon solid organ transplantation


Abstract

Allergy transfer upon solid organ transplantation has been reported in the literature although only few data are available as to the frequency, significance and management of these cases. Based on a review of 577 consecutive deceased donors from the Swisstransplant Donor-Registry, three cases (0.5%) of fatal anaphylaxis were identified, two because of peanut and one of wasp allergy. The sera of all three donors and their ten paired recipients, prospectively collected before and after transplantation from the Swiss-Transplant-Cohort-Study, were retrospectively processed using a commercial protein microarray fluorescent test. As early as five days post-transplantation, newly acquired peanut-specific IgE were transiently detected from one donor to three recipients, of whom one liver and lung recipients developed grade III anaphylaxis. Yet, to define how allergy testing should be performed in transplant recipients and to better understand the impact of immunosuppressive therapy on IgE sensitization, we prospectively studied five atopic living-donor kidney recipients. All pollen-specific IgE and >90% of skin prick tests remained positive 7 days and 3 months after transplantation indicating that early diagnosis of donor-derived IgE sensitization is possible. Importantly, we propose recommendations with respect to safety for recipients undergoing solid-organ transplantation from donors with a history of fatal anaphylaxis.

Abstract

Allergy transfer upon solid organ transplantation has been reported in the literature although only few data are available as to the frequency, significance and management of these cases. Based on a review of 577 consecutive deceased donors from the Swisstransplant Donor-Registry, three cases (0.5%) of fatal anaphylaxis were identified, two because of peanut and one of wasp allergy. The sera of all three donors and their ten paired recipients, prospectively collected before and after transplantation from the Swiss-Transplant-Cohort-Study, were retrospectively processed using a commercial protein microarray fluorescent test. As early as five days post-transplantation, newly acquired peanut-specific IgE were transiently detected from one donor to three recipients, of whom one liver and lung recipients developed grade III anaphylaxis. Yet, to define how allergy testing should be performed in transplant recipients and to better understand the impact of immunosuppressive therapy on IgE sensitization, we prospectively studied five atopic living-donor kidney recipients. All pollen-specific IgE and >90% of skin prick tests remained positive 7 days and 3 months after transplantation indicating that early diagnosis of donor-derived IgE sensitization is possible. Importantly, we propose recommendations with respect to safety for recipients undergoing solid-organ transplantation from donors with a history of fatal anaphylaxis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Oncology and Hematology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Immunology and Allergy
Health Sciences > Transplantation
Health Sciences > Pharmacology (medical)
Language:English
Date:1 March 2020
Deposited On:10 Oct 2019 14:34
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 11:26
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1600-6135
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.15601
PubMed ID:31535461

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Content: Accepted Version
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Embargo till: 2020-09-17