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Methyl bromide [MAK Value Documentation, 2016]


Hartwig, A; MAK Commission; et al; Arand, Michael (2017). Methyl bromide [MAK Value Documentation, 2016]. The MAK Collection for Occupational Health and Safety, 2(4):448-454.

Abstract

The German Commission for the Investigation of Health Hazards of Chemical Compounds in the Work Area has re‐evaluated the developmental toxicity of methyl bromide [ 74‐83‐9]. Available unpublished study reports and publications are described in detail. The maximum concentration at the workplace (MAK value) of methyl bromide is 1 ml/m3, based on the irritant effect on the upper respiratory tract.
NOAECs for prenatal developmental toxicity in rats and rabbits were 70 ml/m3 and 40 ml/m3, respectively. NOAELs of 30 and 10 mg/kg body weight and day in rats and rabbits, respectively, were obtained in gavage studies, corresponding to 14 and 8 ml/m3 after scaling to a concentration at the workplace. Thus, there is an adequate margin between NOAEC/L for developmental toxicity and the MAK value.
However, methyl bromide is a neurotoxin and no data on developmental neurotoxicity exist. In adult mice and rats, neurotoxic symptoms like convulsions and paralysis of the hind limbs are observed. In a two‐generation study the adult F0 and F1 generations do not show such neurotoxic effects at 90 ml/m3, which would have been expected particularly in the F1‐animals, who have a longer exposure time which included complete gestation. It can be inferred that offspring are not more sensitive to the neurotoxicity of methyl bromide than adults. Thus, damage to the embryo or foetus is unlikely when the MAK value is observed and methyl bromide is re‐assigned to Pregnancy Risk Group C.

Abstract

The German Commission for the Investigation of Health Hazards of Chemical Compounds in the Work Area has re‐evaluated the developmental toxicity of methyl bromide [ 74‐83‐9]. Available unpublished study reports and publications are described in detail. The maximum concentration at the workplace (MAK value) of methyl bromide is 1 ml/m3, based on the irritant effect on the upper respiratory tract.
NOAECs for prenatal developmental toxicity in rats and rabbits were 70 ml/m3 and 40 ml/m3, respectively. NOAELs of 30 and 10 mg/kg body weight and day in rats and rabbits, respectively, were obtained in gavage studies, corresponding to 14 and 8 ml/m3 after scaling to a concentration at the workplace. Thus, there is an adequate margin between NOAEC/L for developmental toxicity and the MAK value.
However, methyl bromide is a neurotoxin and no data on developmental neurotoxicity exist. In adult mice and rats, neurotoxic symptoms like convulsions and paralysis of the hind limbs are observed. In a two‐generation study the adult F0 and F1 generations do not show such neurotoxic effects at 90 ml/m3, which would have been expected particularly in the F1‐animals, who have a longer exposure time which included complete gestation. It can be inferred that offspring are not more sensitive to the neurotoxicity of methyl bromide than adults. Thus, damage to the embryo or foetus is unlikely when the MAK value is observed and methyl bromide is re‐assigned to Pregnancy Risk Group C.

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Item Type:Journal Article, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:25 April 2017
Deposited On:17 Oct 2019 12:41
Last Modified:17 Oct 2019 12:41
Publisher:Wiley-VCH Verlag
ISSN:2509-2383
ISBN:9783527600410
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/3527600418.mb7483e6017

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