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Triphenylphosphat, isopropyliert [MAK Value Documentation in German language, 2016]


Hartwig, A; MAK Commission; et al; Arand, Michael (2016). Triphenylphosphat, isopropyliert [MAK Value Documentation in German language, 2016]. The MAK Collection for Occupational Health and Safety, 1(3):1997-2043.

Abstract

Isopropylated triphenyl phosphate1 Isopropylated triphenyl phosphate

The German Commission for the Investigation of Health Hazards of Chemical Compounds in the Work Area has evaluated triisopropylated phenyl phosphate to derive a maximum concentration at the workplace (MAK value), considering all toxicity endpoints. Available unpublished study reports and publications are described in detail. Isopropylated triphenyl phosphate has no irritant effects on the skin of rats and rabbits, and is not, or at most minimally, irritating to the eyes of rabbits. It belongs to the group of organophosphates and shows the typical delayed organophosphate neurotoxicity (axonal degeneration). The neurotoxicity decreases with increasing isopropylation. However, the most sensitive toxicological endpoints following repeated exposures are histopathological changes in the adrenal gland and ovary.

The LOAEC in 90‐day inhalation studies in rats and in hamsters was 10 mg/m3, the lowest tested concentration. Oral studies according to OECD TG 422 and TG 408 have revealed a LOAEL of 25 mg/kg bw and day in rats. Neurotoxicity tests in hens have yielded a NOAEL of 20 mg/kg bw and day. After scaling these NOAELs to a concentration at the workplace, a MAK value of 1 mg/m3 is derived. As the systemic effect is critical, isopropylated triphenyl phosphate is assigned to Peak Limitation Category II with the default excursion factor of 2, as no specific toxicokinetic data are available.

No developmental toxicity was observed at 260 mg isopropylated triphenylphosphate/kg bw/day. Therefore, no damage to the embryo or fetus has to be expected and isopropylated triphenyl phosphate is classified in Pregnancy Risk Group C.

Isopropylated triphenyl phosphate is not genotoxic in vitro or in vivo nor does it have cell‐transforming activity. No data on carcinogenicity are available. Overall, the available data do not indicate that the substance should be classified as a carcinogen or a germ cell mutagen.

Sensitizing potential was not investigated with isopropylated triphenyl phosphate, and similar compounds have led to inconclusive results.

Absorption through the skin is low and does not relevantly contribute to systemic toxicity.

Abstract

Isopropylated triphenyl phosphate1 Isopropylated triphenyl phosphate

The German Commission for the Investigation of Health Hazards of Chemical Compounds in the Work Area has evaluated triisopropylated phenyl phosphate to derive a maximum concentration at the workplace (MAK value), considering all toxicity endpoints. Available unpublished study reports and publications are described in detail. Isopropylated triphenyl phosphate has no irritant effects on the skin of rats and rabbits, and is not, or at most minimally, irritating to the eyes of rabbits. It belongs to the group of organophosphates and shows the typical delayed organophosphate neurotoxicity (axonal degeneration). The neurotoxicity decreases with increasing isopropylation. However, the most sensitive toxicological endpoints following repeated exposures are histopathological changes in the adrenal gland and ovary.

The LOAEC in 90‐day inhalation studies in rats and in hamsters was 10 mg/m3, the lowest tested concentration. Oral studies according to OECD TG 422 and TG 408 have revealed a LOAEL of 25 mg/kg bw and day in rats. Neurotoxicity tests in hens have yielded a NOAEL of 20 mg/kg bw and day. After scaling these NOAELs to a concentration at the workplace, a MAK value of 1 mg/m3 is derived. As the systemic effect is critical, isopropylated triphenyl phosphate is assigned to Peak Limitation Category II with the default excursion factor of 2, as no specific toxicokinetic data are available.

No developmental toxicity was observed at 260 mg isopropylated triphenylphosphate/kg bw/day. Therefore, no damage to the embryo or fetus has to be expected and isopropylated triphenyl phosphate is classified in Pregnancy Risk Group C.

Isopropylated triphenyl phosphate is not genotoxic in vitro or in vivo nor does it have cell‐transforming activity. No data on carcinogenicity are available. Overall, the available data do not indicate that the substance should be classified as a carcinogen or a germ cell mutagen.

Sensitizing potential was not investigated with isopropylated triphenyl phosphate, and similar compounds have led to inconclusive results.

Absorption through the skin is low and does not relevantly contribute to systemic toxicity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:25 July 2016
Deposited On:18 Oct 2019 08:44
Last Modified:18 Oct 2019 08:44
Publisher:Wiley-VCH Verlag
ISSN:2509-2383
ISBN:9783527600410
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/3527600418.mb6893741d0061

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