Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Ash pollen allergy and aerobiology


Gassner, Markus; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Clot, Bernard (2019). Ash pollen allergy and aerobiology. Allergo Journal International, 28(7):289-298.

Abstract

Background
Allergy to ash pollen is common in some parts of Europe. Sensitization is overlooked if Oleaceae pollen allergens are not included in screening tests.
Methods
Between 1983 and 2007, sensitization to aeroallergens was systematically investigated using serological methods in 15-year-old school children (Immuno-CAP [carrier polymer] test). Samples from 1986 and 2006 were also tested using the immuno-solid-phase allergen chip (ISAC) assay. School children with sensitizations in 1986 were retested in 2010. Airborne pollen concentrations were determined by the Swiss pollen measuring network.
Results
Sensitization (>0.7 kU/l) to ash pollen (Fraxinus americana t15)—16.3% (102/627)—was more frequent than to birch pollen (Betula verrucosa t3): 15.3% (96/627). ISAC assays performed in children in 1986 and 2006 revealed higher molecular seroprevalence for nOle e 1 (15%; 15/100) compared to rBet v 1 (12%; 12/100). Followed-up subjects (age, 39) showed an increase in sensitizations to ash pollen. IgE levels to pollen from indigenous ash (Fraxinus excelsior t25) were higher than to pollen from American ash (Fraxinus americana t15). Low ash pollen emission levels were recorded at all measuring sites in Switzerland every 2–4 years. The infection of ashes by Chalara fraxinea resulted in increased emission of ash pollen.
Conclusion
Symptoms in individuals sensitized to ash pollen vary according to the pollen count and may be masked by pollen from other trees that flower at the same time of year. Sensitization to ash/Ole e 1 can be higher than to birch/Bet v 1. The determination of IgE to common ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is more sensitive than to American ash (Fraxinus americana). Ash dieback due to Chalara appears to increase pollen emission. Allergies to ash pollen can be significantly underestimated due to a failure to (correctly) identify them; they can also be masked by other pollen families (birch). Harmful organisms such as Chalara can intensify pollen emissions at least temporarily.

Abstract

Background
Allergy to ash pollen is common in some parts of Europe. Sensitization is overlooked if Oleaceae pollen allergens are not included in screening tests.
Methods
Between 1983 and 2007, sensitization to aeroallergens was systematically investigated using serological methods in 15-year-old school children (Immuno-CAP [carrier polymer] test). Samples from 1986 and 2006 were also tested using the immuno-solid-phase allergen chip (ISAC) assay. School children with sensitizations in 1986 were retested in 2010. Airborne pollen concentrations were determined by the Swiss pollen measuring network.
Results
Sensitization (>0.7 kU/l) to ash pollen (Fraxinus americana t15)—16.3% (102/627)—was more frequent than to birch pollen (Betula verrucosa t3): 15.3% (96/627). ISAC assays performed in children in 1986 and 2006 revealed higher molecular seroprevalence for nOle e 1 (15%; 15/100) compared to rBet v 1 (12%; 12/100). Followed-up subjects (age, 39) showed an increase in sensitizations to ash pollen. IgE levels to pollen from indigenous ash (Fraxinus excelsior t25) were higher than to pollen from American ash (Fraxinus americana t15). Low ash pollen emission levels were recorded at all measuring sites in Switzerland every 2–4 years. The infection of ashes by Chalara fraxinea resulted in increased emission of ash pollen.
Conclusion
Symptoms in individuals sensitized to ash pollen vary according to the pollen count and may be masked by pollen from other trees that flower at the same time of year. Sensitization to ash/Ole e 1 can be higher than to birch/Bet v 1. The determination of IgE to common ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is more sensitive than to American ash (Fraxinus americana). Ash dieback due to Chalara appears to increase pollen emission. Allergies to ash pollen can be significantly underestimated due to a failure to (correctly) identify them; they can also be masked by other pollen families (birch). Harmful organisms such as Chalara can intensify pollen emissions at least temporarily.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

23 downloads since deposited on 22 Oct 2019
23 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 November 2019
Deposited On:22 Oct 2019 14:51
Last Modified:01 Nov 2019 02:10
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:2197-0378
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s40629-019-00105-6

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Ash pollen allergy and aerobiology'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)