Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The effects of social norms among peer groups on risk behavior: A multilevel approach to differentiate perceived and collective norms


Geber, Sarah; Baumann, Eva; Czerwinski, Fabian; Klimmt, Christoph (2019). The effects of social norms among peer groups on risk behavior: A multilevel approach to differentiate perceived and collective norms. Communication Research, 48(3):319-345.

Abstract

Social norms have been found to be an important factor in individuals’ health and risk behaviors. Past research has typically addressed which social norms individuals perceive in their social environments (e.g., in their peer group). The present article explores normative social influences beyond such perceptions by applying a multilevel approach and differentiating between perceived norms at the individual level and collective norms at the group level. Data on norms and three road traffic risk behaviors (speeding, driving after drinking, and texting while driving) were obtained from a representative survey among young German car drivers (N = 311 anchor respondents) and their peer groups (overall N = 1,244). Multilevel modeling (MLM) revealed that beyond individual normative perceptions of peers’ behavior and approval, actual collective norms (peers’ actual risk behavior and attitudes) affect individuals’ risk behaviors. Findings are discussed with regard to theorizing normative influences on risk behavior and practical implications.

Abstract

Social norms have been found to be an important factor in individuals’ health and risk behaviors. Past research has typically addressed which social norms individuals perceive in their social environments (e.g., in their peer group). The present article explores normative social influences beyond such perceptions by applying a multilevel approach and differentiating between perceived norms at the individual level and collective norms at the group level. Data on norms and three road traffic risk behaviors (speeding, driving after drinking, and texting while driving) were obtained from a representative survey among young German car drivers (N = 311 anchor respondents) and their peer groups (overall N = 1,244). Multilevel modeling (MLM) revealed that beyond individual normative perceptions of peers’ behavior and approval, actual collective norms (peers’ actual risk behavior and attitudes) affect individuals’ risk behaviors. Findings are discussed with regard to theorizing normative influences on risk behavior and practical implications.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
32 citations in Web of Science®
30 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

156 downloads since deposited on 04 Nov 2019
16 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Communication and Media Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:070 News media, journalism & publishing
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Language and Linguistics
Social Sciences & Humanities > Communication
Social Sciences & Humanities > Linguistics and Language
Language:English
Date:17 January 2019
Deposited On:04 Nov 2019 13:25
Last Modified:21 Feb 2024 02:45
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0093-6502
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0093650218824213
  • Content: Accepted Version