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Volumetric Analysis of Allogenic and Xenogenic Bone Substitutes Used in Maxillary Sinus Augmentations Utilizing Cone Beam CT: A Prospective Randomized Pilot Study


Salem, Daliah; Alshihri, Abdulmonem; Arguello, Emilio; Jung, Ronald E; Mohmed, Hamed A; Friedland, Bernard (2019). Volumetric Analysis of Allogenic and Xenogenic Bone Substitutes Used in Maxillary Sinus Augmentations Utilizing Cone Beam CT: A Prospective Randomized Pilot Study. International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, 34(4):920–926.

Abstract

PURPOSE The purpose of this prospective randomized clinical pilot study was to compare the three-dimensional changes of grafted maxillary sinuses when deproteinized bovine bone (DBB) or cortical mineralized allogeneic bone (MAB) was used.
MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventeen patients were randomly assigned to receive either DBB or MAB for lateral-approach maxillary sinus augmentation. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were performed preoperatively (T0), immediately after (T1), and at approximately 6 months posthoperatively (T2). Three-dimensional analysis of the radiographic volumetric changes was performed for DBB and MAB by measuring the difference in unoccupied sinus volumes at T1 and T2.
RESULTS In the DBB group, a statistically significant increase in unoccupied sinus volume was found at T2 when compared to T1 (P = .001). It represents a mean resorption rate of 23.8% ± 15.9%. Similarly in the MAB group, a statistically significant increase in unoccupied sinus volume was found at T2 when compared to T1 (P = .007). The mean resorption rate in the MAB group was 19.5% ± 10.1%. There was no statistically significant difference between the contraction of DBB (23.8%) and MAB (19.5%) (P = .52).
CONCLUSION Both DBB and MAB showed sufficient volume stability at T2 (mean 6.3 ± 1.6 months) postoperatively for 10- to 13-mm-implant placement without the need for additional grafting.

Abstract

PURPOSE The purpose of this prospective randomized clinical pilot study was to compare the three-dimensional changes of grafted maxillary sinuses when deproteinized bovine bone (DBB) or cortical mineralized allogeneic bone (MAB) was used.
MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventeen patients were randomly assigned to receive either DBB or MAB for lateral-approach maxillary sinus augmentation. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were performed preoperatively (T0), immediately after (T1), and at approximately 6 months posthoperatively (T2). Three-dimensional analysis of the radiographic volumetric changes was performed for DBB and MAB by measuring the difference in unoccupied sinus volumes at T1 and T2.
RESULTS In the DBB group, a statistically significant increase in unoccupied sinus volume was found at T2 when compared to T1 (P = .001). It represents a mean resorption rate of 23.8% ± 15.9%. Similarly in the MAB group, a statistically significant increase in unoccupied sinus volume was found at T2 when compared to T1 (P = .007). The mean resorption rate in the MAB group was 19.5% ± 10.1%. There was no statistically significant difference between the contraction of DBB (23.8%) and MAB (19.5%) (P = .52).
CONCLUSION Both DBB and MAB showed sufficient volume stability at T2 (mean 6.3 ± 1.6 months) postoperatively for 10- to 13-mm-implant placement without the need for additional grafting.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Reconstructive Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Oral Surgery
Language:English
Date:2019
Deposited On:24 Oct 2019 12:47
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 11:32
Publisher:Quintessence Publishing
ISSN:0882-2786
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.11607/jomi.7318
PubMed ID:30779821

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