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Importance of Sequence and Timing in Parasite Coinfections


Karvonen, Anssi; Jokela, Jukka; Laine, Anna-Liisa (2019). Importance of Sequence and Timing in Parasite Coinfections. Trends in Parasitology, 35(2):109-118.

Abstract

Coinfections by multiple parasites predominate in the wild. Interactions between parasites can be antagonistic, neutral, or facilitative, and they can have significant implications for epidemiology, disease dynamics, and evolution of virulence. Coinfections commonly result from sequential exposure of hosts to different parasites. We argue that the sequential nature of coinfections is important for the consequences of infection in both natural and man-made environments. Coinfections accumulate during host lifespan, determining the structure of the parasite infracommunity. Interactions within the parasite community and their joint effect on the host individual potentially shape evolution of parasite life‐history traits and transmission biology. Overall, sequential coinfections have the potential to change evolutionary and epidemiological outcomes of host–parasite interactions widely across plant and animal systems.

Abstract

Coinfections by multiple parasites predominate in the wild. Interactions between parasites can be antagonistic, neutral, or facilitative, and they can have significant implications for epidemiology, disease dynamics, and evolution of virulence. Coinfections commonly result from sequential exposure of hosts to different parasites. We argue that the sequential nature of coinfections is important for the consequences of infection in both natural and man-made environments. Coinfections accumulate during host lifespan, determining the structure of the parasite infracommunity. Interactions within the parasite community and their joint effect on the host individual potentially shape evolution of parasite life‐history traits and transmission biology. Overall, sequential coinfections have the potential to change evolutionary and epidemiological outcomes of host–parasite interactions widely across plant and animal systems.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Parasitology, Infectious Diseases
Language:English
Date:1 February 2019
Deposited On:31 Oct 2019 13:53
Last Modified:19 Jan 2020 07:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1471-4922
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2018.11.007
Project Information:
  • : FunderH2020
  • : Grant ID724508
  • : Project TitleRESISTANCE - Resistance evolution in response to spatially variable pathogen communities

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