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Changes in the canine plasma lipidome after short- and long-term excess glucocorticoid exposure


Sieber-Ruckstuhl, Nadja S; Burla, Bo; Spoerel, Susanne; Schmid, Florence; Venzin, Claudio; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Bendt, Anne K; Torta, Federico; Wenk, Markus R; Boretti, Felicitas S (2019). Changes in the canine plasma lipidome after short- and long-term excess glucocorticoid exposure. Scientific Reports, 9(1):6015.

Abstract

Glucocorticoids (GCs) are critical regulators of metabolic control in mammals and their aberrant function has been linked to several pathologies. GCs are widely used in human and veterinary clinical practice as potent anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive agents. Dyslipidaemia is a frequently observed consequence of GC treatment, typified by increased lipolysis, lipid mobilization, liponeogenesis, and adipogenesis. Dogs with excess GC show hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, and a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, but the risk of developing atherosclerotic lesions is low as compared to humans. This study aimed to examine alterations in the canine plasma lipidome in a model of experimentally induced short-term and long-term GC excess. Both treatments led to significant plasma lipidome alterations, which were more pronounced after long-term excess steroid exposure. In particular, monohexosylceramides, phosphatidylinositols, ether phosphatidylcholines, acyl phosphatidylcholines, triacylglycerols and sphingosine 1-phosphates showed significant changes. The present study highlights the hitherto unknown effects of GCs on lipid metabolism, which will be important in the further elucidation of the role and function of GCs as drugs and in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

Abstract

Glucocorticoids (GCs) are critical regulators of metabolic control in mammals and their aberrant function has been linked to several pathologies. GCs are widely used in human and veterinary clinical practice as potent anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive agents. Dyslipidaemia is a frequently observed consequence of GC treatment, typified by increased lipolysis, lipid mobilization, liponeogenesis, and adipogenesis. Dogs with excess GC show hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, and a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, but the risk of developing atherosclerotic lesions is low as compared to humans. This study aimed to examine alterations in the canine plasma lipidome in a model of experimentally induced short-term and long-term GC excess. Both treatments led to significant plasma lipidome alterations, which were more pronounced after long-term excess steroid exposure. In particular, monohexosylceramides, phosphatidylinositols, ether phosphatidylcholines, acyl phosphatidylcholines, triacylglycerols and sphingosine 1-phosphates showed significant changes. The present study highlights the hitherto unknown effects of GCs on lipid metabolism, which will be important in the further elucidation of the role and function of GCs as drugs and in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Multidisciplinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:Multidisciplinary
Language:English
Date:12 April 2019
Deposited On:11 Dec 2019 12:53
Last Modified:22 Apr 2020 21:23
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-42190-1
PubMed ID:30979907

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