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The Noise-Resilient Brain: Resting-State Oscillatory Activity Predicts Words-In-Noise Recognition


Houweling, Thomas; Becker, Robert; Hervais-Adelman, Alexis (2019). The Noise-Resilient Brain: Resting-State Oscillatory Activity Predicts Words-In-Noise Recognition. bioRxiv 705053v1, University of Zurich.

Abstract

The role of neuronal oscillations in the processing of speech has recently come to prominence. Since resting-state (RS) brain activity has been shown to predict both task-related brain activation and behavioural performance, we set out to establish whether inter-individual differences in spectrally-resolved RS-MEG power are associated with variations in speech in noise recognition. In a frequency range between 21 and 29 Hz, significant positive correlations were observed between voxelwise power and resilience to noise in a large left-lateralised perisylvian cluster spanning from inferior frontal gyrus to temporo-parietal junction and peaking in left posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG). Smaller areas of association were also found around the right pSTG (21-29Hz) and bilateral pSTG (30-40Hz). These findings are spatially and spectrally consistent with the neural substrates of phonological processing. We propose that increased RS power in auditory cortices and the left perisylvian region can partly explain improved resilience to noise.<jats:sec>Highlights<jats:list list-type="bullet"><jats:list-item>Power of resting MEG activity predicts Words-In-Noise recognition performance</jats:list-item><jats:list-item>Significant associations in higher beta and lower gamma frequency band</jats:list-item><jats:list-item>Strongest in left-lateralised perisylvian cluster peaking in posterior STG</jats:list-item><jats:list-item>Effects are spectrally and spatially consistent with phoneme-level processing</jats:list-item></jats:list></jats:sec>

Abstract

The role of neuronal oscillations in the processing of speech has recently come to prominence. Since resting-state (RS) brain activity has been shown to predict both task-related brain activation and behavioural performance, we set out to establish whether inter-individual differences in spectrally-resolved RS-MEG power are associated with variations in speech in noise recognition. In a frequency range between 21 and 29 Hz, significant positive correlations were observed between voxelwise power and resilience to noise in a large left-lateralised perisylvian cluster spanning from inferior frontal gyrus to temporo-parietal junction and peaking in left posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG). Smaller areas of association were also found around the right pSTG (21-29Hz) and bilateral pSTG (30-40Hz). These findings are spatially and spectrally consistent with the neural substrates of phonological processing. We propose that increased RS power in auditory cortices and the left perisylvian region can partly explain improved resilience to noise.<jats:sec>Highlights<jats:list list-type="bullet"><jats:list-item>Power of resting MEG activity predicts Words-In-Noise recognition performance</jats:list-item><jats:list-item>Significant associations in higher beta and lower gamma frequency band</jats:list-item><jats:list-item>Strongest in left-lateralised perisylvian cluster peaking in posterior STG</jats:list-item><jats:list-item>Effects are spectrally and spatially consistent with phoneme-level processing</jats:list-item></jats:list></jats:sec>

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Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2019
Deposited On:31 Oct 2019 09:27
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 11:36
Series Name:bioRxiv
ISSN:2164-7844
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1101/705053
Official URL:https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/705053v1
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P1_163726
  • : Project TitleExploring audio-motor integration: a novel approach to overcoming hearing impairment

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