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High‐Speed Large‐Field Multifocal Illumination Fluorescence Microscopy


Chen, Zhenyue; Mc Larney, Benedict; Rebling, Johannes; Dean-Ben, Xose Luis; Zhou, Quanyu; Gottschalk, Sven; Razansky, Daniel (2020). High‐Speed Large‐Field Multifocal Illumination Fluorescence Microscopy. Laser and Photonics Reviews, 14(2):1900070.

Abstract

Scanning optical microscopy techniques are commonly restricted to a sub‐millimeter field‐of‐view (FOV) or otherwise employ slow mechanical translation, limiting their applicability for imaging fast biological dynamics occurring over large areas. A rapid scanning large‐field multifocal illumination (LMI) fluorescence microscopy technique is devised based on a beam‐splitting grating and an acousto‐optic deflector synchronized with a high‐speed camera to attain real‐time fluorescence microscopy over a centimeter‐scale FOV. Owing to its large depth of focus, the approach allows noninvasive visualization of perfusion across the entire mouse cerebral cortex, not achievable with conventional wide‐field fluorescence microscopy methods. The new concept can readily be incorporated into conventional wide‐field microscopes to mitigate image blur due to tissue scattering and attain optimal trade‐off between spatial resolution and FOV. It further establishes a bridge between conventional wide‐field macroscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy, thus it is anticipated to find broad applicability in functional neuroimaging, in vivo cell tracking, and other applications looking at large‐scale fluorescent‐based biodynamics.

Abstract

Scanning optical microscopy techniques are commonly restricted to a sub‐millimeter field‐of‐view (FOV) or otherwise employ slow mechanical translation, limiting their applicability for imaging fast biological dynamics occurring over large areas. A rapid scanning large‐field multifocal illumination (LMI) fluorescence microscopy technique is devised based on a beam‐splitting grating and an acousto‐optic deflector synchronized with a high‐speed camera to attain real‐time fluorescence microscopy over a centimeter‐scale FOV. Owing to its large depth of focus, the approach allows noninvasive visualization of perfusion across the entire mouse cerebral cortex, not achievable with conventional wide‐field fluorescence microscopy methods. The new concept can readily be incorporated into conventional wide‐field microscopes to mitigate image blur due to tissue scattering and attain optimal trade‐off between spatial resolution and FOV. It further establishes a bridge between conventional wide‐field macroscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy, thus it is anticipated to find broad applicability in functional neuroimaging, in vivo cell tracking, and other applications looking at large‐scale fluorescent‐based biodynamics.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2020
Deposited On:04 Nov 2019 12:21
Last Modified:02 Feb 2021 17:23
Publisher:Wiley-VCH Verlag
ISSN:1863-8899
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/lpor.201900070

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