Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Inter- and transgenerational inheritance of behavioral phenotypes


Jawaid, Ali; Mansuy, Isabelle M (2019). Inter- and transgenerational inheritance of behavioral phenotypes. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 25:96-101.

Abstract

Adult animal behaviors are determined by complex and dynamic changes in gene expression in different brain regions and are influenced by life experiences and environmental exposures. These stimuli affect gene expression through intricate mechanisms of regulation that largely implicate epigenetic factors, such as, DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Through these molecular pathways, some of the behavioral phenotypes associated with life experiences can be stably transmitted to descendants, sometimes across several generations. Rodent studies indicate that parental stressful and traumatic experiences can lead to behavioral despair, risk-taking behaviors, altered sociability and atypical responses to stressful stimuli in the offspring, whereas parental environmental enrichment has been associated with improved cognition and stress resilience in the offspring. Similar observations have been made in humans; children and grandchildren of genocide survivors show increased psychopathology and emotional disturbances. At the molecular level, changes in germline ncRNAs have been identified as likely vectors of transmission in rodents. The mechanisms linking behavioral stimuli to the germline, and factors responsible for these changes and their persistence across generations remain, however, largely unidentified.

Abstract

Adult animal behaviors are determined by complex and dynamic changes in gene expression in different brain regions and are influenced by life experiences and environmental exposures. These stimuli affect gene expression through intricate mechanisms of regulation that largely implicate epigenetic factors, such as, DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Through these molecular pathways, some of the behavioral phenotypes associated with life experiences can be stably transmitted to descendants, sometimes across several generations. Rodent studies indicate that parental stressful and traumatic experiences can lead to behavioral despair, risk-taking behaviors, altered sociability and atypical responses to stressful stimuli in the offspring, whereas parental environmental enrichment has been associated with improved cognition and stress resilience in the offspring. Similar observations have been made in humans; children and grandchildren of genocide survivors show increased psychopathology and emotional disturbances. At the molecular level, changes in germline ncRNAs have been identified as likely vectors of transmission in rodents. The mechanisms linking behavioral stimuli to the germline, and factors responsible for these changes and their persistence across generations remain, however, largely unidentified.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

55 downloads since deposited on 08 Nov 2019
55 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Brain Research Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Life Sciences > Behavioral Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:1 February 2019
Deposited On:08 Nov 2019 15:40
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 11:39
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2352-1546
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cobeha.2018.12.004

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Inter- and transgenerational inheritance of behavioral phenotypes'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 247kB
View at publisher