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Closing conflicts. Conversational strategies across Greek and Roman tragedies


Martin, Gunther; Iurescia, Federica (2019). Closing conflicts. Conversational strategies across Greek and Roman tragedies. Lingue e Linguaggi, 31:233-254.

Abstract

Pre-closing and closing sequences are a standard feature of conversations, permitting a harmonious end to an exchange. As Schegloff and Sacks (1973, p. 289) put it, a conversation “does not simply end, but is brought to a close”. The absence of closing sequences, in turn, is a strong indicator of some irregularity, potentially a conflict between the interlocutors. This paper deals with closing sequences in ancient tragedy. According to the rules of the genre, tragedies deal with conflicts that do not find a peaceful resolution, barring a few exceptions. There is thus a significant number of conversations in which no agreement is reached. Often, the close of the dialogues does not follow the regular patterns. Instead, the non-negotiated and unmediated end affirms the non-cooperative nature of the
dialogue. This paper looks specifically at how the close of the conversation is managed where disagreement persists, in an approach that considers both the specificity of the individual situation and broad diachronic developments. It thus offers a contribution to the systematization of termination of dialogue, complementing in particular the wide field of
studies on closing procedures with a survey of texts in which these procedures are not observed.

Abstract

Pre-closing and closing sequences are a standard feature of conversations, permitting a harmonious end to an exchange. As Schegloff and Sacks (1973, p. 289) put it, a conversation “does not simply end, but is brought to a close”. The absence of closing sequences, in turn, is a strong indicator of some irregularity, potentially a conflict between the interlocutors. This paper deals with closing sequences in ancient tragedy. According to the rules of the genre, tragedies deal with conflicts that do not find a peaceful resolution, barring a few exceptions. There is thus a significant number of conversations in which no agreement is reached. Often, the close of the dialogues does not follow the regular patterns. Instead, the non-negotiated and unmediated end affirms the non-cooperative nature of the
dialogue. This paper looks specifically at how the close of the conversation is managed where disagreement persists, in an approach that considers both the specificity of the individual situation and broad diachronic developments. It thus offers a contribution to the systematization of termination of dialogue, complementing in particular the wide field of
studies on closing procedures with a survey of texts in which these procedures are not observed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Greek and Latin Philology
Dewey Decimal Classification:470 Latin & Italic languages
480 Classical & modern Greek languages
Language:English
Date:2019
Deposited On:15 Nov 2019 16:29
Last Modified:13 Dec 2019 10:24
Publisher:Universita degli Studi del Salento * Coordinamento S I B A
ISSN:2239-0367
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1285/i22390359v31p233
Official URL:http://siba-ese.unisalento.it/index.php/linguelinguaggi/article/view/21161/17904
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNF
  • : Grant IDPP00P1–157444/1
  • : Project Title

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