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Brain maturation in the first 3 months of life, measured by electroencephalogram: A comparison between preterm and term-born infants


Guyer, Caroline; Werner, Helene; Wehrle, Flavia; Bölsterli, Bigna Katrin; Hagmann, Cornelia; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto (2019). Brain maturation in the first 3 months of life, measured by electroencephalogram: A comparison between preterm and term-born infants. Clinical Neurophysiology, 130(10):1859-1868.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Preterm infants are at risk for altered brain maturation resulting in neurodevelopmental impairments. Topographical analysis of high-density electroencephalogram during sleep matches underlying brain maturation. Using such an EEG mapping approach could identify preterm infants at risk early in life.

METHODS

20 preterm (gestational age < 32 weeks) and 20 term-born infants (gestational age > 37 weeks) were recorded by 18-channel daytime sleep-EEG at term age (GA 40 weeks for preterm and 2-3 days after birth for term infants) and 3 months (corrected age for preterm infants).

RESULTS

Preterm infant's power spectrum at term age is immature, leveling off with term infants at 3 months of age. Topographical distribution of maximal power density however, reveals qualitative differences between the groups until 3 months of age. Preterm infants exhibit more temporal than central activation at term age and more occipital than central activation at 3 months of age. Moreover, being less mature at term age predicts being less mature at 3 months of age.

CONCLUSION

Topographical analysis of sleep EEG reveals changes in brain maturation between term and preterm infants early in life.

SIGNIFICANCE

In future, automated analysis tools using topographical power distribution could help identify preterm infants at risk early in life.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Preterm infants are at risk for altered brain maturation resulting in neurodevelopmental impairments. Topographical analysis of high-density electroencephalogram during sleep matches underlying brain maturation. Using such an EEG mapping approach could identify preterm infants at risk early in life.

METHODS

20 preterm (gestational age < 32 weeks) and 20 term-born infants (gestational age > 37 weeks) were recorded by 18-channel daytime sleep-EEG at term age (GA 40 weeks for preterm and 2-3 days after birth for term infants) and 3 months (corrected age for preterm infants).

RESULTS

Preterm infant's power spectrum at term age is immature, leveling off with term infants at 3 months of age. Topographical distribution of maximal power density however, reveals qualitative differences between the groups until 3 months of age. Preterm infants exhibit more temporal than central activation at term age and more occipital than central activation at 3 months of age. Moreover, being less mature at term age predicts being less mature at 3 months of age.

CONCLUSION

Topographical analysis of sleep EEG reveals changes in brain maturation between term and preterm infants early in life.

SIGNIFICANCE

In future, automated analysis tools using topographical power distribution could help identify preterm infants at risk early in life.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Sensory Systems
Life Sciences > Neurology
Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Health Sciences > Physiology (medical)
Language:English
Date:October 2019
Deposited On:21 Nov 2019 14:19
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 11:49
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2019.06.230
PubMed ID:31401493

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