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Adhesion of resin cements to contaminated zirconia resin cements on zirconia: effect saliva-contamination and surface conditioning


Mangione, Elisabetta; Özcan, Mutlu (2019). Adhesion of resin cements to contaminated zirconia resin cements on zirconia: effect saliva-contamination and surface conditioning. Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, 33(14):1572-1583.

Abstract

This study evaluated the adhesion of resin cements to zirconia after saliva contamination using resin cements with different chemistries. Zirconia discs (N = 240, n = 10 per group) were randomly divided into three groups: (a) C: No contamination (Control), (b) S: Contamination with saliva, (c) S + AA: Contamination with saliva followed by air-abrasion (CoJet). While half of the specimens were not conditioned, the other half were conditioned with 37.5% H3PO4 for 60 s. After rinsing, all specimen surfaces were silanized (Monobond Plus). Resin cements based on either methacrylate (Variolink II–VL) or MDP monomer (Panavia 21-PN) were polymerized on the substrates. The specimens were randomly divided into two further groups to be tested either after (a) 24 h dry storage at 37 °C or (b) thermocycling (×5000, 5–55 °C). Microshear bond (MSB) tests were conducted in a Universal Testing Machine and failure types were analyzed. Data were analyzed using Univariate analysis and Tukey’s tests (alpha = 0.05). While saliva contamination, 37.5% H3PO4 application (p < .001) and aging (p < .05) significantly affected the bond results, cement type did not show significant difference after aging (p > .05). Adhesive strength of PN (1.2–4.4 MPa) on saliva contaminated and etched zirconia was more stable than that of VL (0–2.8 MPa). After aging, bond strength results decreased the most with VL (3–100%) compared to PN (32–71%) but the decrease was less in the air-abraded groups after aging (VL: 3%; PN: 32%). Exclusively adhesive failures were experienced in all groups.

Abstract

This study evaluated the adhesion of resin cements to zirconia after saliva contamination using resin cements with different chemistries. Zirconia discs (N = 240, n = 10 per group) were randomly divided into three groups: (a) C: No contamination (Control), (b) S: Contamination with saliva, (c) S + AA: Contamination with saliva followed by air-abrasion (CoJet). While half of the specimens were not conditioned, the other half were conditioned with 37.5% H3PO4 for 60 s. After rinsing, all specimen surfaces were silanized (Monobond Plus). Resin cements based on either methacrylate (Variolink II–VL) or MDP monomer (Panavia 21-PN) were polymerized on the substrates. The specimens were randomly divided into two further groups to be tested either after (a) 24 h dry storage at 37 °C or (b) thermocycling (×5000, 5–55 °C). Microshear bond (MSB) tests were conducted in a Universal Testing Machine and failure types were analyzed. Data were analyzed using Univariate analysis and Tukey’s tests (alpha = 0.05). While saliva contamination, 37.5% H3PO4 application (p < .001) and aging (p < .05) significantly affected the bond results, cement type did not show significant difference after aging (p > .05). Adhesive strength of PN (1.2–4.4 MPa) on saliva contaminated and etched zirconia was more stable than that of VL (0–2.8 MPa). After aging, bond strength results decreased the most with VL (3–100%) compared to PN (32–71%) but the decrease was less in the air-abraded groups after aging (VL: 3%; PN: 32%). Exclusively adhesive failures were experienced in all groups.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Reconstructive Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Materials Chemistry, Mechanics of Materials, General Chemistry, Surfaces, Coatings and Films, Surfaces and Interfaces
Language:English
Date:18 July 2019
Deposited On:04 Dec 2019 13:57
Last Modified:05 Dec 2019 08:37
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0169-4243
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/01694243.2019.1602903

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