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Nucleus accumbens connectivity at rest is associated with alcohol consumption in young male adults


Veer, Ilya M; Jetzschmann, Paul; Garbusow, Maria; Nebe, Stephan; Frank, Robin; Kuitunen-Paul, Sören; Sebold, Miriam; Ripke, Stephan; Heinz, Andreas; Friedel, Eva; Smolka, Michael N; Walter, Henrik (2019). Nucleus accumbens connectivity at rest is associated with alcohol consumption in young male adults. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 29(12):1476-1485.

Abstract

Alcohol consumption during adolescence might impede normal brain development, while more excessive drinking during this period poses a risk for developing alcohol use disorder. Here it was tested whether nucleus accumbens (NAcc) resting-state functional connectivity could be associated with lifetime drinking behavior in young adults, and whether it could predict their alcohol consumption during a one-year follow-up period. The current investigation was part of the bicentric Learning and Alcohol Dependence (LeAD) population-based prospective cohort study. One hundred and eighty-four 18-year-old male social drinking volunteers without a lifetime diagnosis of psychotic, bipolar, or alcohol use disorder were recruited from the general population. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity was calculated for the bilateral NAcc in each participant. Across the group, the association between NAcc functional connectivity and lifetime alcohol consumption was assessed (p < .05, whole-brain FWE-corrected). Individual connectivity values were then extracted from regions that demonstrated a significant association to predict drinking behavior during a one-year follow-up period (n = 143), correcting for lifetime alcohol consumption. Weaker connectivity between the left NAcc and bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, left caudate nucleus, left putamen, and left insula was associated with greater lifetime alcohol consumption, as well as with greater alcohol consumption during the one-year follow-up period. Our findings underscore the relevance of fronto-striatal connectivity to the field of alcohol research. Impaired prefrontal cognitive control might mediate excessive drinking behavior and may prove a promising biomarker for risk of future alcohol (ab)use.

Abstract

Alcohol consumption during adolescence might impede normal brain development, while more excessive drinking during this period poses a risk for developing alcohol use disorder. Here it was tested whether nucleus accumbens (NAcc) resting-state functional connectivity could be associated with lifetime drinking behavior in young adults, and whether it could predict their alcohol consumption during a one-year follow-up period. The current investigation was part of the bicentric Learning and Alcohol Dependence (LeAD) population-based prospective cohort study. One hundred and eighty-four 18-year-old male social drinking volunteers without a lifetime diagnosis of psychotic, bipolar, or alcohol use disorder were recruited from the general population. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity was calculated for the bilateral NAcc in each participant. Across the group, the association between NAcc functional connectivity and lifetime alcohol consumption was assessed (p < .05, whole-brain FWE-corrected). Individual connectivity values were then extracted from regions that demonstrated a significant association to predict drinking behavior during a one-year follow-up period (n = 143), correcting for lifetime alcohol consumption. Weaker connectivity between the left NAcc and bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, left caudate nucleus, left putamen, and left insula was associated with greater lifetime alcohol consumption, as well as with greater alcohol consumption during the one-year follow-up period. Our findings underscore the relevance of fronto-striatal connectivity to the field of alcohol research. Impaired prefrontal cognitive control might mediate excessive drinking behavior and may prove a promising biomarker for risk of future alcohol (ab)use.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Uncontrolled Keywords:Alcohol use, adolescents, resting-state functional connectivity, nucleus accumbens, lateral prefrontal cortex, pharmacology (medical), biological psychiatry, pharmacology, neurology, psychiatry and mental health, clinical neurology
Language:English
Date:1 December 2019
Deposited On:22 Nov 2019 11:24
Last Modified:25 Dec 2019 02:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0924-977X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.euroneuro.2019.10.008

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