Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Influence of Acute Physical Activity on Stress Reactivity in Obese and Normal Weight Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial


Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Horsch, Antje; Schindler, Christian; Boichat, Anaëlle; Kriemler, Susi; Munsch, Simone; Crottet, Bertrand; Marquez-Vidal, Pedro M; Borghini, Ayala; Puder, Jardena J (2019). Influence of Acute Physical Activity on Stress Reactivity in Obese and Normal Weight Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Obesity Facts, 12(1):115-130.

Abstract

Objective: Physical activity (PA) may influence acute stress reactivity in children differently depending on their weight. This randomized controlled trial investigated the impact of acute PA and of BMI status (overweight/obese (OB/OW) and normal weight (NW) on stress reactivity. Method: 50 prepubertal children (24 OW/OB and 26 NW) were randomly assigned to the PA or sedentary arm (SED) for 30 min followed by a stress task. Salivary cortisol, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were measured. Results: An interaction effect between the randomization arms and weight status on salivary cortisol was found after the stress task (p = 0.04). Cortisol increased in the SED, but not in the PA arm (p = 0.004 for differences in time course) of NW children. Time course did not differ between both arms in OW/OB children (p = 0.7). OW/OB SED children had a flat cortisol course, and levels were reduced compared to the NW SED or the OW/OB PA children (p ≤ 0.03). Systolic BP increased only in the SED arm (p = 0.01). HR was higher in the PA than in the SED arm during stress (p < 0.001) and showed different time courses (p = 0.006). Conclusion: PA impacted on acute stress reactivity and influenced stress reactivity differently in NW and OW/OB children.

Abstract

Objective: Physical activity (PA) may influence acute stress reactivity in children differently depending on their weight. This randomized controlled trial investigated the impact of acute PA and of BMI status (overweight/obese (OB/OW) and normal weight (NW) on stress reactivity. Method: 50 prepubertal children (24 OW/OB and 26 NW) were randomly assigned to the PA or sedentary arm (SED) for 30 min followed by a stress task. Salivary cortisol, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were measured. Results: An interaction effect between the randomization arms and weight status on salivary cortisol was found after the stress task (p = 0.04). Cortisol increased in the SED, but not in the PA arm (p = 0.004 for differences in time course) of NW children. Time course did not differ between both arms in OW/OB children (p = 0.7). OW/OB SED children had a flat cortisol course, and levels were reduced compared to the NW SED or the OW/OB PA children (p ≤ 0.03). Systolic BP increased only in the SED arm (p = 0.01). HR was higher in the PA than in the SED arm during stress (p < 0.001) and showed different time courses (p = 0.006). Conclusion: PA impacted on acute stress reactivity and influenced stress reactivity differently in NW and OW/OB children.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

13 downloads since deposited on 05 Dec 2019
13 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Physiology (medical), Health(social science)
Language:English
Date:1 January 2019
Deposited On:05 Dec 2019 11:09
Last Modified:01 Jan 2020 18:05
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1662-4025
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000494294
PubMed ID:30844804

Download

Gold Open Access

Download PDF  'Influence of Acute Physical Activity on Stress Reactivity in Obese and Normal Weight Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 788kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)