Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Clinical and structural outcome 20 years after repair of massive rotator cuff tears


Collin, Philippe; Betz, Michael; Herve, Anthony; Walch, Gilles; Mansat, Pierre; Favard, Luc; Colmar, Michel; François Kempf, Jean; Thomazeau, Hervé; Gerber, Christian (2020). Clinical and structural outcome 20 years after repair of massive rotator cuff tears. Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 29(3):521-526.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Short- and mid-term outcomes after massive cuff tear repair are well reported, but there is no documentation of the clinical and structural outcomes at 20 years of follow-up. The hypothesis of the present study was that at 20 years, deterioration of the shoulder would have occurred and led to a substantial number of reoperations.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively recalled all 127 patients operated for massive rotator cuff tears in 1994 at 6 different centers. At the 20-year follow-up, 26 patients died and 35 were lost to follow-up. Thirteen (10.2%) had been reoperated. This left 53 patients for personal clinical assessment. Forty-nine consented to standardized radiographic evaluation for assessment of osteoarthritis, 36 patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging, allowing assessment of tendon healing, atrophy, and fatty infiltration (FI) of the cuff muscles.

RESULTS

The final Constant-Murley score (CS) was 68 ± 17.7 (range, 8-91) vs. 44 ± 15.3 (range, 13-74) preoperatively (P < .05). The final Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV) was 73% ± 23% (range, 0-100). Retears (Sugaya IV and V) were found in 17 cases (47%). Nine patients (17%) had cuff tear arthropathy (Hamada stage 4). The CS and SSV for the shoulders with FI stages III or IV were significantly inferior (53 ± 19 points and 65% ± 14% respectively) than for those with FI stages 0-II (respectively, 71.6 ± 6 points and 73% ± 4%) (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS

Twenty years after surgical repair of massive rotator cuff tears, the functional scores remain satisfactory, and the rate of revision is low.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Short- and mid-term outcomes after massive cuff tear repair are well reported, but there is no documentation of the clinical and structural outcomes at 20 years of follow-up. The hypothesis of the present study was that at 20 years, deterioration of the shoulder would have occurred and led to a substantial number of reoperations.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively recalled all 127 patients operated for massive rotator cuff tears in 1994 at 6 different centers. At the 20-year follow-up, 26 patients died and 35 were lost to follow-up. Thirteen (10.2%) had been reoperated. This left 53 patients for personal clinical assessment. Forty-nine consented to standardized radiographic evaluation for assessment of osteoarthritis, 36 patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging, allowing assessment of tendon healing, atrophy, and fatty infiltration (FI) of the cuff muscles.

RESULTS

The final Constant-Murley score (CS) was 68 ± 17.7 (range, 8-91) vs. 44 ± 15.3 (range, 13-74) preoperatively (P < .05). The final Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV) was 73% ± 23% (range, 0-100). Retears (Sugaya IV and V) were found in 17 cases (47%). Nine patients (17%) had cuff tear arthropathy (Hamada stage 4). The CS and SSV for the shoulders with FI stages III or IV were significantly inferior (53 ± 19 points and 65% ± 14% respectively) than for those with FI stages 0-II (respectively, 71.6 ± 6 points and 73% ± 4%) (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS

Twenty years after surgical repair of massive rotator cuff tears, the functional scores remain satisfactory, and the rate of revision is low.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 March 2020
Deposited On:12 Feb 2020 11:54
Last Modified:15 Feb 2020 02:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1058-2746
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2019.07.031
PubMed ID:31594728

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library