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Minimally invasive arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint: A systematic literature review


Hodel, Sandro; Viehöfer, Arnd; Wirth, Stephan (2020). Minimally invasive arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint: A systematic literature review. Foot and Ankle Surgery, 26(6):601-606.

Abstract

AIM

Currently, cohort studies reported the use of minimally invasive arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP I). The aim of this systematic literature review was to analyse clinical, radiological outcome and complications with this technique.

METHODS

A systemic literature search of the databases Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE and Cochrane to identify studies reporting on clinical, radiological outcome or complications of minimally invasive MTP I arthrodesis was conducted.

RESULTS

A total of 6 studies (1 Level V, 5 Level IV) reporting on 109 minimally invasive MTP arthrodesis in 105 patients were included. Validated scores were reported in 103 cases. Clinical outcome improved in 57 cases from a mean of 36.9 to 82.6 points American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Score (AOFAS) and in 46 cases from 38.7 to 18.4 points Manchester Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ). Radiological fusion rate was 87% (n = 94 out of 109) achieved after 6-12 weeks. Overall complication rate was 11.9% (13 cases) leading to revision surgeries in 5.5% (6 cases). Most common complications Most common complications were symptomatic non-union (n = 6, 5.5%), asymptomatic non-union (n = 2, 1.8%) and subsequent interphalangeal joint arthritis (n = 2, 1.8%).

CONCLUSION

Minimally invasive MTP I arthrodesis is a promising technique with comparable clinical, radiological outcome and complication rates to open surgery in hallux rigidus and rigido-valgus. Future studies are needed providing higher level of evidence to prove the potential benefit of minimally invasive compared to open MTP I arthrodesis.

Abstract

AIM

Currently, cohort studies reported the use of minimally invasive arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP I). The aim of this systematic literature review was to analyse clinical, radiological outcome and complications with this technique.

METHODS

A systemic literature search of the databases Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE and Cochrane to identify studies reporting on clinical, radiological outcome or complications of minimally invasive MTP I arthrodesis was conducted.

RESULTS

A total of 6 studies (1 Level V, 5 Level IV) reporting on 109 minimally invasive MTP arthrodesis in 105 patients were included. Validated scores were reported in 103 cases. Clinical outcome improved in 57 cases from a mean of 36.9 to 82.6 points American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Score (AOFAS) and in 46 cases from 38.7 to 18.4 points Manchester Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ). Radiological fusion rate was 87% (n = 94 out of 109) achieved after 6-12 weeks. Overall complication rate was 11.9% (13 cases) leading to revision surgeries in 5.5% (6 cases). Most common complications Most common complications were symptomatic non-union (n = 6, 5.5%), asymptomatic non-union (n = 2, 1.8%) and subsequent interphalangeal joint arthritis (n = 2, 1.8%).

CONCLUSION

Minimally invasive MTP I arthrodesis is a promising technique with comparable clinical, radiological outcome and complication rates to open surgery in hallux rigidus and rigido-valgus. Future studies are needed providing higher level of evidence to prove the potential benefit of minimally invasive compared to open MTP I arthrodesis.

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2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 August 2020
Deposited On:09 Jan 2020 09:45
Last Modified:04 Aug 2020 01:02
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1268-7731
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fas.2019.09.001
PubMed ID:31582288

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