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Revision After Total Transmetatarsal Amputation


Kaiser, Peter; Häller, Thomas Vincent; Uçkay, Ilker; Kaiser, Dominik; Berli, Martin; Böni, Thomas; Waibel, Felix (2019). Revision After Total Transmetatarsal Amputation. Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery, 58(6):1171-1176.

Abstract

Total transmetatarsal amputation (TMA) can be an option for foot salvage in gangrene, sepsis, or infected necrosis. However, the literature concerning predictive outcome factors and bacterial sampling is scarce. To identify potential associations between revision surgery and underlying bacteria or other preoperative selection criteria, we reviewed all patients with TMA who were treated at our institution. We compared the patients with remissions with surgical revisions. Among 96 adult patients with TMA (105 amputations), 42 required a revision surgery (40%), 18 had a further minor proximal surgical reamputation (17%) and 18 had a major proximal surgical reamputation (14%). In group comparisons, a previous infection with Staphylococcus aureus was protective with a lower revision risk (4/26 with revision surgery vs 22/26 without revisions; p = .03). This was the opposite for postoperative persistent soft tissue or bone infections (p < .01) and delayed wound healing (p < .01), which were positively associated with a revision risk. The American Society of Anesthesiologists Score, sex, age, body mass index, diabetes, polyneuropathy, chronic renal failure, dialysis, peripheral arterial disease, smoking status, and antibiotic regimen did not influence this revision risk. These results must be interpreted cautiously because no multiple variable calculations could be conducted as a result of the paucity of cases and confounding could not be evaluated sufficiently. TMA is an option to prevent major amputations, but it may be associated with a subsequent revision risk of 40% in adult patients. In our cohort study, persistent postamputation infection and delayed wound healing were associated with revision. However, no preoperative selection criteria were found that lead to revision surgery except for an infection with Staphylococcus aureus, which protected against revision surgery.

Abstract

Total transmetatarsal amputation (TMA) can be an option for foot salvage in gangrene, sepsis, or infected necrosis. However, the literature concerning predictive outcome factors and bacterial sampling is scarce. To identify potential associations between revision surgery and underlying bacteria or other preoperative selection criteria, we reviewed all patients with TMA who were treated at our institution. We compared the patients with remissions with surgical revisions. Among 96 adult patients with TMA (105 amputations), 42 required a revision surgery (40%), 18 had a further minor proximal surgical reamputation (17%) and 18 had a major proximal surgical reamputation (14%). In group comparisons, a previous infection with Staphylococcus aureus was protective with a lower revision risk (4/26 with revision surgery vs 22/26 without revisions; p = .03). This was the opposite for postoperative persistent soft tissue or bone infections (p < .01) and delayed wound healing (p < .01), which were positively associated with a revision risk. The American Society of Anesthesiologists Score, sex, age, body mass index, diabetes, polyneuropathy, chronic renal failure, dialysis, peripheral arterial disease, smoking status, and antibiotic regimen did not influence this revision risk. These results must be interpreted cautiously because no multiple variable calculations could be conducted as a result of the paucity of cases and confounding could not be evaluated sufficiently. TMA is an option to prevent major amputations, but it may be associated with a subsequent revision risk of 40% in adult patients. In our cohort study, persistent postamputation infection and delayed wound healing were associated with revision. However, no preoperative selection criteria were found that lead to revision surgery except for an infection with Staphylococcus aureus, which protected against revision surgery.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Language:English
Date:November 2019
Deposited On:09 Jan 2020 09:36
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 11:57
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1067-2516
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1053/j.jfas.2019.03.015
PubMed ID:31679669

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