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Timeline of functional recovery after hip fracture in seniors aged 65 and older: a prospective observational analysis


Fischer, K; Trombik, Malgorzata; Freystätter, G; Egli, A; Theiler, R; Bischoff-Ferrari, H A (2019). Timeline of functional recovery after hip fracture in seniors aged 65 and older: a prospective observational analysis. Osteoporosis International, 30(7):1371-1381.

Abstract

Summary

We investigated the timeline of functional recovery after hip fracture over 12 months in adults age ≥ 65 years using objective lower extremity function tests and subjective physical functioning. Objective functional recovery was largely complete in the first 6 months, whereas subjective recovery improved up to 9 months after hip fracture.
Introduction

Hip fractures are a major cause of loss of function among seniors. We assessed the timeline of objective and subjective functional recovery after hip fracture.
Methods

We conducted a prospective observational secondary analysis of a 1-year clinical trial on vitamin D and home exercise treatment and complications after hip fracture among 173 patients age ≥ 65 years (mean age 84 years; 79.2% women; 77.4% community-dwelling) conducted from January 2005 through December 2007. Lower extremity function (Timed Up and Go test (TUG), knee extensor and flexor strength) and grip strength was assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months follow-up. Subjective physical functioning was assessed using the SF-36 questionnaire also at 3 and 9 months follow-up. Multivariable-adjusted repeated-measures models were used to assess the timeline of functional recovery in the total population and in subgroups of patients.
Results

Lower extremity function including TUG (− 61.1%), knee extensor (+ 17.6%), and knee flexor (+ 11.6%) strength improved significantly in the first 6 months (P < 0.001). However, between 6 and 12 months, there was no further significant improvement for any of the functional tests. Grip strength decreased from baseline to 6 months (− 7.9%; P < 0.001) and from 6 to 12 months (− 10.8%; P < 0.001). Subjective physical functioning improved from 3 to 9 months (+ 15.2%, P < 0.001), but no longer thereafter.
Conclusions

Functional recovery after hip fracture may be largely complete in the first 6 months for objective functional tests, whereas may extend up to 9 months for subjective recovery, with oldest-old, female, institutionalized, and cognitively impaired patients recovering most poorly.
Clinical trials registry (original trial)

NCT00133640.

Abstract

Summary

We investigated the timeline of functional recovery after hip fracture over 12 months in adults age ≥ 65 years using objective lower extremity function tests and subjective physical functioning. Objective functional recovery was largely complete in the first 6 months, whereas subjective recovery improved up to 9 months after hip fracture.
Introduction

Hip fractures are a major cause of loss of function among seniors. We assessed the timeline of objective and subjective functional recovery after hip fracture.
Methods

We conducted a prospective observational secondary analysis of a 1-year clinical trial on vitamin D and home exercise treatment and complications after hip fracture among 173 patients age ≥ 65 years (mean age 84 years; 79.2% women; 77.4% community-dwelling) conducted from January 2005 through December 2007. Lower extremity function (Timed Up and Go test (TUG), knee extensor and flexor strength) and grip strength was assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months follow-up. Subjective physical functioning was assessed using the SF-36 questionnaire also at 3 and 9 months follow-up. Multivariable-adjusted repeated-measures models were used to assess the timeline of functional recovery in the total population and in subgroups of patients.
Results

Lower extremity function including TUG (− 61.1%), knee extensor (+ 17.6%), and knee flexor (+ 11.6%) strength improved significantly in the first 6 months (P < 0.001). However, between 6 and 12 months, there was no further significant improvement for any of the functional tests. Grip strength decreased from baseline to 6 months (− 7.9%; P < 0.001) and from 6 to 12 months (− 10.8%; P < 0.001). Subjective physical functioning improved from 3 to 9 months (+ 15.2%, P < 0.001), but no longer thereafter.
Conclusions

Functional recovery after hip fracture may be largely complete in the first 6 months for objective functional tests, whereas may extend up to 9 months for subjective recovery, with oldest-old, female, institutionalized, and cognitively impaired patients recovering most poorly.
Clinical trials registry (original trial)

NCT00133640.

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18 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Geriatric Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Uncontrolled Keywords:Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Language:English
Date:1 July 2019
Deposited On:18 Dec 2019 16:02
Last Modified:29 Jan 2023 10:36
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0937-941X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-019-04944-5
PubMed ID:30941485
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