Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The changing face of labour between Hawai'i, Japan and Colonial Taiwan


Dusinberre, Martin (2019). The changing face of labour between Hawai'i, Japan and Colonial Taiwan. Historische Anthropologie, 27(3):336-360.

Abstract

This paper examines one of the most iconic images of the first Japanese sugar labourers to Hawai‘i, painted by Joseph D. Strong in 1885. Now preserved in a private collection in Tokyo, the painting is a window into the world of transplanted lives in the late- nineteenth century, in particular the way these labourers became a contested site of imagination for different constituencies catering to their arrival--the Japanese government, the Hawaiian king, the sugar plantation owners, and the local press. Moreover, Strong’s work points to the complex layering of historical memory across the traditional historiographical divide of “Asia” and “the Pacific” in the early-twentieth-century: the painting’s meanings changed between its departure from Honolulu and its arrival in Yokohama, and changed once again after it was bequeathed to the Taiwan Sugar Company in the mid-1920s. Taking the painting’s frame as a metaphor, the paper examines how the history of Japanese emigration to Hawai‘i was framed at the turn of the twentieth-century, and by whom. Who has painted this history, we might ask, and to what purpose?

Abstract

This paper examines one of the most iconic images of the first Japanese sugar labourers to Hawai‘i, painted by Joseph D. Strong in 1885. Now preserved in a private collection in Tokyo, the painting is a window into the world of transplanted lives in the late- nineteenth century, in particular the way these labourers became a contested site of imagination for different constituencies catering to their arrival--the Japanese government, the Hawaiian king, the sugar plantation owners, and the local press. Moreover, Strong’s work points to the complex layering of historical memory across the traditional historiographical divide of “Asia” and “the Pacific” in the early-twentieth-century: the painting’s meanings changed between its departure from Honolulu and its arrival in Yokohama, and changed once again after it was bequeathed to the Taiwan Sugar Company in the mid-1920s. Taking the painting’s frame as a metaphor, the paper examines how the history of Japanese emigration to Hawai‘i was framed at the turn of the twentieth-century, and by whom. Who has painted this history, we might ask, and to what purpose?

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of History
Dewey Decimal Classification:900 History
Language:English
Date:December 2019
Deposited On:24 Jan 2020 10:52
Last Modified:24 Jan 2020 10:52
Publisher:Böhlau Verlag
ISSN:0942-8704
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.7788/hian.2019.27.3.336
Related URLs:https://www.recherche-portal.ch/permalink/f/1h21i27/ebi01_prod001485202 (Library Catalogue)

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library