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Intermittent fasting improves metabolic flexibility in short-term high-fat diet-fed mice


Dedual, Mara A; Wueest, Stephan; Borsigova, Marcela; Konrad, Daniel (2019). Intermittent fasting improves metabolic flexibility in short-term high-fat diet-fed mice. American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, 317(5):E773-E782.

Abstract

Four days of high-fat diet (HFD) feeding are sufficient to induce glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis in mice. While prolonged HFD-induced metabolic complications are partly mediated by increased food intake during the light (inactive) phase, such a link has not yet been established in short-term HFD-fed mice. Herein, we hypothesized that a short bout of HFD desynchronizes feeding behavior, thereby contributing to glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. To this end, 12-wk-old C57BL/6J littermates were fed a HFD for 4 days either ad libitum or intermittently. Intermittent-fed mice were fasted for 8 h during their inactive phase. Initiation of HFD led to an immediate increase in food intake already during the first light phase. Moreover, glucose tolerance was significantly impaired in ad libitum- but not in intermittent HFD-fed mice, indicating that desynchronized feeding behavior contributes to short-term HFD-induced glucose intolerance. Of note, overall food intake was similar between the groups, as was body weight. However, intermittent HFD-fed mice revealed higher fat depot weights. Phosphorylation of hormone sensitivity lipase and free fatty acid release from isolated adipocytes were significantly elevated, suggesting increased lipolysis in intermittent HFD-fed mice. Moreover, hepatic mRNA expression of lipogenetic enzymes and liver triglyceride levels were significantly increased in intermittent HFD-fed mice. Importantly, food deprivation decreased respiratory exchange ratio promptly in intermittent- but not in ad libitum HFD-fed mice. In conclusion, retaining a normal feeding pattern prevented HFD-induced impairment of metabolic flexibility in short-term HFD-fed mice.

Abstract

Four days of high-fat diet (HFD) feeding are sufficient to induce glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis in mice. While prolonged HFD-induced metabolic complications are partly mediated by increased food intake during the light (inactive) phase, such a link has not yet been established in short-term HFD-fed mice. Herein, we hypothesized that a short bout of HFD desynchronizes feeding behavior, thereby contributing to glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. To this end, 12-wk-old C57BL/6J littermates were fed a HFD for 4 days either ad libitum or intermittently. Intermittent-fed mice were fasted for 8 h during their inactive phase. Initiation of HFD led to an immediate increase in food intake already during the first light phase. Moreover, glucose tolerance was significantly impaired in ad libitum- but not in intermittent HFD-fed mice, indicating that desynchronized feeding behavior contributes to short-term HFD-induced glucose intolerance. Of note, overall food intake was similar between the groups, as was body weight. However, intermittent HFD-fed mice revealed higher fat depot weights. Phosphorylation of hormone sensitivity lipase and free fatty acid release from isolated adipocytes were significantly elevated, suggesting increased lipolysis in intermittent HFD-fed mice. Moreover, hepatic mRNA expression of lipogenetic enzymes and liver triglyceride levels were significantly increased in intermittent HFD-fed mice. Importantly, food deprivation decreased respiratory exchange ratio promptly in intermittent- but not in ad libitum HFD-fed mice. In conclusion, retaining a normal feeding pattern prevented HFD-induced impairment of metabolic flexibility in short-term HFD-fed mice.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Life Sciences > Physiology
Health Sciences > Physiology (medical)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Physiology (medical), Physiology, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Language:English
Date:1 November 2019
Deposited On:09 Jan 2020 09:03
Last Modified:01 Nov 2020 01:04
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:0193-1849
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpendo.00187.2019
PubMed ID:31503513

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