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Can Anything Good Ever Come From Bearing Migraine Attacks? Suggestions for a Comprehensive Concept of Gain in Migraine


Pohl, Heiko; Schubring-Giese, Maximilian; Gantenbein, Andreas R (2019). Can Anything Good Ever Come From Bearing Migraine Attacks? Suggestions for a Comprehensive Concept of Gain in Migraine. Current Pain and Headache Reports, 23(12):90.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

The purpose of this review is to summarise the current state of knowledge concerning known types of gain, the reasons why patients might seek it, as well as implications for headache disorders.

RECENT FINDINGS

Even though the subject has been studied in the past, it received less attention in recent years. There is no doubt that migraine is a highly disabling disorder. However, attacks sometimes may be beneficial for the migraine brain as a time-out from the daily routine. On the other hand, patients are often stigmatised as trying to satisfy other needs through their disease. These "other needs" may be the exaggerated seeking for attention and affection or an undue official sickness certificate and were named secondary gain. Striving for secondary gain denotes a behaviour that aims at benefiting from a disease in a way that is seen as inappropriate by others. The fact that the term has persisted in doctors' vocabulary for decades probably indicates that it designates a concept considered relevant by many. However, its usage is complicated by its usually imprecise definition. We found in a literature search that the strive for secondary gain is not limited to neurosis, might both occur consciously and unconsciously, sometimes may aim at financial gain and sometimes at social gain, and can either be potentially expected or readily obtained. This behaviour mainly seems to aim at shaping one's interactions with the environment. Its causes have not been elucidated completely, though, but "unrequited demands for love, attention and affection" have been postulated. The desire for social gain can be influenced by approaches based upon behavioural psychology. Broaching the issue of secondary gain may be beneficial in the daily clinical routine.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

The purpose of this review is to summarise the current state of knowledge concerning known types of gain, the reasons why patients might seek it, as well as implications for headache disorders.

RECENT FINDINGS

Even though the subject has been studied in the past, it received less attention in recent years. There is no doubt that migraine is a highly disabling disorder. However, attacks sometimes may be beneficial for the migraine brain as a time-out from the daily routine. On the other hand, patients are often stigmatised as trying to satisfy other needs through their disease. These "other needs" may be the exaggerated seeking for attention and affection or an undue official sickness certificate and were named secondary gain. Striving for secondary gain denotes a behaviour that aims at benefiting from a disease in a way that is seen as inappropriate by others. The fact that the term has persisted in doctors' vocabulary for decades probably indicates that it designates a concept considered relevant by many. However, its usage is complicated by its usually imprecise definition. We found in a literature search that the strive for secondary gain is not limited to neurosis, might both occur consciously and unconsciously, sometimes may aim at financial gain and sometimes at social gain, and can either be potentially expected or readily obtained. This behaviour mainly seems to aim at shaping one's interactions with the environment. Its causes have not been elucidated completely, though, but "unrequited demands for love, attention and affection" have been postulated. The desire for social gain can be influenced by approaches based upon behavioural psychology. Broaching the issue of secondary gain may be beneficial in the daily clinical routine.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Health Sciences > Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
Language:English
Date:16 November 2019
Deposited On:24 Jan 2020 09:27
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 12:18
Publisher:Current Science Inc.
ISSN:1534-3081
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11916-019-0829-2
PubMed ID:31734850

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