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Places in information science


Purves, Ross S; Winter, Stephan; Kuhn, Werner (2019). Places in information science. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 70(11):1173-1182.

Abstract

Human spatial concepts, such as the concept of place, are not immediately translatable to the geometric foundations of spatial databases and information systems developed over the past 50 years. These systems typically rest on the concepts of objects and fields, both bound to coordinates, as two general paradigms of geographic representation. The match between notions of place occurring in everyday where questions and the data available to answer such questions is unclear and hinders progress in place‐based information systems. This is particularly true in novel application areas such as the Digital Humanities or speech‐based human–computer interaction, but also for location‐based services. Although this shortcoming has been observed before, we approach the challenges of relating places to information system representations with a fresh view, based on a set of core concepts of spatial information. These concepts have been proposed in information science with the intent of serving human–machine spatial question asking and answering. Clarifying the relationship of the notion of place to these concepts is a significant step toward geographically intelligent systems. The main result of the article is a demonstration that the notion of place fits existing concepts of spatial information, when these are adequately exploited and combined.

Abstract

Human spatial concepts, such as the concept of place, are not immediately translatable to the geometric foundations of spatial databases and information systems developed over the past 50 years. These systems typically rest on the concepts of objects and fields, both bound to coordinates, as two general paradigms of geographic representation. The match between notions of place occurring in everyday where questions and the data available to answer such questions is unclear and hinders progress in place‐based information systems. This is particularly true in novel application areas such as the Digital Humanities or speech‐based human–computer interaction, but also for location‐based services. Although this shortcoming has been observed before, we approach the challenges of relating places to information system representations with a fresh view, based on a set of core concepts of spatial information. These concepts have been proposed in information science with the intent of serving human–machine spatial question asking and answering. Clarifying the relationship of the notion of place to these concepts is a significant step toward geographically intelligent systems. The main result of the article is a demonstration that the notion of place fits existing concepts of spatial information, when these are adequately exploited and combined.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Uncontrolled Keywords:Computer Networks and Communications, Information Systems and Management, Library and Information Sciences, Information Systems
Language:English
Date:1 November 2019
Deposited On:18 Dec 2019 15:44
Last Modified:18 Dec 2019 15:46
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:2330-1635
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.24194
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID200021_149823
  • : Project TitlePlace-based map generalization (PlaceGen)

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Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)