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Calcium channels and calcium-regulated channels in human red blood cells


Kaestner, Lars; Bogdanova, Anna; Egee, Stephane (2020). Calcium channels and calcium-regulated channels in human red blood cells. In: Islam, Shahidul. Calcium Signaling. Springer, Cham: Springer, 625-648.

Abstract

Free Calcium (Ca2+) is an important and universal signalling entity in all cells, red blood cells included. Although mature mammalian red blood cells are believed to not contain organelles as Ca2+ stores such as the endoplasmic reticulum or mitochondria, a 20,000-fold gradient based on a intracellular Ca2+ concentration of approximately 60 nM vs. an extracellular concentration of 1.2 mM makes Ca2+-permeable channels a major signalling tool of red blood cells. However, the internal Ca2+ concentration is tightly controlled, regulated and maintained primarily by the Ca2+ pumps PMCA1 and PMCA4. Within the last two decades it became evident that an increased intracellular Ca2+ is associated with red blood cell clearance in the spleen and promotes red blood cell aggregability and clot formation. In contrast to this rather uncontrolled deadly Ca2+ signals only recently it became evident, that a temporal increase in intracellular Ca2+ can also have positive effects such as the modulation of the red blood cells O2 binding properties or even be vital for brief transient cellular volume adaptation when passing constrictions like small capillaries or slits in the spleen. Here we give an overview of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+-regulated channels in red blood cells, namely the Gárdos channel, the non-selective voltage dependent cation channel, Piezo1, the NMDA receptor, VDAC, TRPC channels, CaV2.1, a Ca2+-inhibited channel novel to red blood cells and i.a. relate these channels to the molecular unknown sickle cell disease conductance Psickle. Particular attention is given to correlation of functional measurements with molecular entities as well as the physiological and pathophysiological function of these channels. This view is in constant progress and in particular the understanding of the interaction of several ion channels in a physiological context just started. This includes on the one hand channelopathies, where a mutation of the ion channel is the direct cause of the disease, like Hereditary Xerocytosis and the Gárdos Channelopathy. On the other hand it applies to red blood cell related diseases where an altered channel activity is a secondary effect like in sickle cell disease or thalassemia. Also these secondary effects should receive medical and pharmacologic attention because they can be crucial when it comes to the life-threatening symptoms of the disease.

Abstract

Free Calcium (Ca2+) is an important and universal signalling entity in all cells, red blood cells included. Although mature mammalian red blood cells are believed to not contain organelles as Ca2+ stores such as the endoplasmic reticulum or mitochondria, a 20,000-fold gradient based on a intracellular Ca2+ concentration of approximately 60 nM vs. an extracellular concentration of 1.2 mM makes Ca2+-permeable channels a major signalling tool of red blood cells. However, the internal Ca2+ concentration is tightly controlled, regulated and maintained primarily by the Ca2+ pumps PMCA1 and PMCA4. Within the last two decades it became evident that an increased intracellular Ca2+ is associated with red blood cell clearance in the spleen and promotes red blood cell aggregability and clot formation. In contrast to this rather uncontrolled deadly Ca2+ signals only recently it became evident, that a temporal increase in intracellular Ca2+ can also have positive effects such as the modulation of the red blood cells O2 binding properties or even be vital for brief transient cellular volume adaptation when passing constrictions like small capillaries or slits in the spleen. Here we give an overview of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+-regulated channels in red blood cells, namely the Gárdos channel, the non-selective voltage dependent cation channel, Piezo1, the NMDA receptor, VDAC, TRPC channels, CaV2.1, a Ca2+-inhibited channel novel to red blood cells and i.a. relate these channels to the molecular unknown sickle cell disease conductance Psickle. Particular attention is given to correlation of functional measurements with molecular entities as well as the physiological and pathophysiological function of these channels. This view is in constant progress and in particular the understanding of the interaction of several ion channels in a physiological context just started. This includes on the one hand channelopathies, where a mutation of the ion channel is the direct cause of the disease, like Hereditary Xerocytosis and the Gárdos Channelopathy. On the other hand it applies to red blood cell related diseases where an altered channel activity is a secondary effect like in sickle cell disease or thalassemia. Also these secondary effects should receive medical and pharmacologic attention because they can be crucial when it comes to the life-threatening symptoms of the disease.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:CaV2.1; Calcium-inhibited channel; Gárdos channel; NMDA receptor; Non-selective voltage dependent cation channel; Piezo1; Psickle, Anaemia; TRPC channel; VDAC
Language:English
Date:1 January 2020
Deposited On:07 Jan 2020 16:16
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 15:10
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Number:1131
ISSN:0065-2598
ISBN:9783030124564
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-12457-1_25
PubMed ID:31646528

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