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Investigative drugs for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL): an update


Ramelyte, Egle; Dummer, Reinhard; Guenova, Emmanuella (2019). Investigative drugs for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL): an update. Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs, 28(9):799-809.

Abstract

Introduction: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a heterogeneous group of skin-homing T-cell neoplasms, which represent approximately 75% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas. Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome are the most common CTCL. Early stage disease follows a protracted course, carries a 5-year disease specific survival of 97% and can be treated with skin-directed therapies. Widespread, advanced disease has a 5-year OS of less than 25% and necessitates systemic treatment. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a potentially curative treatment option for advanced CTCL, however, transplant-related morbidity and mortality must be considered and a risk-benefit assessment performed on individual basis. Areas covered: Herein, we provide a review of investigative drugs in early-stage trials for the treatment of cutaneous CTCL, including topically applied immunomodulators such as replicating herpes virus or toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist resiquimod and systemic therapies with monoclonal antibodies, such as anti-CD47, recombinant cytotoxic interleukin 2 fusion protein anti-KIR3DL2 antibody and anti-miR-155 antibody. Expert Opinion: Among the reviewed drugs, resiquimod shows promising clinical efficacy with good tolerability in early CTCL. In refractory or relapsed disease, intratumoral anti-CD47-, anti-CCR4- and anti-KIR3DL2-antibodies show high response rates, however, latter two also show considerable toxicity. Larger trials are needed to better evaluate the discussed therapies.

Abstract

Introduction: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a heterogeneous group of skin-homing T-cell neoplasms, which represent approximately 75% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas. Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome are the most common CTCL. Early stage disease follows a protracted course, carries a 5-year disease specific survival of 97% and can be treated with skin-directed therapies. Widespread, advanced disease has a 5-year OS of less than 25% and necessitates systemic treatment. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a potentially curative treatment option for advanced CTCL, however, transplant-related morbidity and mortality must be considered and a risk-benefit assessment performed on individual basis. Areas covered: Herein, we provide a review of investigative drugs in early-stage trials for the treatment of cutaneous CTCL, including topically applied immunomodulators such as replicating herpes virus or toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist resiquimod and systemic therapies with monoclonal antibodies, such as anti-CD47, recombinant cytotoxic interleukin 2 fusion protein anti-KIR3DL2 antibody and anti-miR-155 antibody. Expert Opinion: Among the reviewed drugs, resiquimod shows promising clinical efficacy with good tolerability in early CTCL. In refractory or relapsed disease, intratumoral anti-CD47-, anti-CCR4- and anti-KIR3DL2-antibodies show high response rates, however, latter two also show considerable toxicity. Larger trials are needed to better evaluate the discussed therapies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Pharmacology
Health Sciences > Pharmacology (medical)
Language:English
Date:September 2019
Deposited On:15 Jan 2020 13:37
Last Modified:10 Dec 2020 15:55
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1354-3784
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/13543784.2019.1654995
PubMed ID:31398295

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