Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The Effect of Non-Gabapentinoid Anticonvulsants on Sensorimotor Recovery After Human Spinal Cord Injury


Warner, Freda M; Jutzeler, Catherine R; Cragg, Jacquelyn J; Tong, Bobo; Grassner, Lukas; Bradke, Frank; Geisler, Fred; Kramer, John K (2019). The Effect of Non-Gabapentinoid Anticonvulsants on Sensorimotor Recovery After Human Spinal Cord Injury. CNS Drugs, 33(5):503-511.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent observational studies have shown an association between gabapentinoid anticonvulsants and greater motor recovery after spinal cord injury. There is preclinical evidence to suggest that other anticonvulsants, such as sodium channel blockers, may also confer beneficial effects.

PURPOSE

The aim of the current study was to determine if non-gabapentinoid anticonvulsants were associated with neurological recovery after acute, traumatic spinal cord injury.

METHODS

This was an observational cohort study using data from the Sygen clinical trial. The primary outcome was total motor score recovery in the first year after injury. Anticonvulsant use was extracted from concomitant medication records; individuals were classified based on early administration (within 30 days of injury), or late/no administration. Motor recovery was compared using linear mixed effects regression models with a drug-by-time interaction, and adjustment for confounders. A secondary analysis incorporated a propensity score matched cohort.

RESULTS

Of the cohort (n = 570), 6% received anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, phenytoin, clonazepam, phenobarbital, and valproic acid) early after injury. After adjustments for initial injury level and severity, early exposure to non-gabapentinoid anticonvulsants was not associated with motor neurological outcomes (p = 0.38 for all anticonvulsants, p = 0.83 for sodium channel blockers, p = 0.82 in propensity-matched cohort).

CONCLUSION

Non-gabapentinoid anticonvulsant exposure was not associated with greater or lesser neurological recovery. This suggests that these medications, as administered for the acute management of spinal cord injury, do not impact long-term neurological outcomes.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent observational studies have shown an association between gabapentinoid anticonvulsants and greater motor recovery after spinal cord injury. There is preclinical evidence to suggest that other anticonvulsants, such as sodium channel blockers, may also confer beneficial effects.

PURPOSE

The aim of the current study was to determine if non-gabapentinoid anticonvulsants were associated with neurological recovery after acute, traumatic spinal cord injury.

METHODS

This was an observational cohort study using data from the Sygen clinical trial. The primary outcome was total motor score recovery in the first year after injury. Anticonvulsant use was extracted from concomitant medication records; individuals were classified based on early administration (within 30 days of injury), or late/no administration. Motor recovery was compared using linear mixed effects regression models with a drug-by-time interaction, and adjustment for confounders. A secondary analysis incorporated a propensity score matched cohort.

RESULTS

Of the cohort (n = 570), 6% received anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, phenytoin, clonazepam, phenobarbital, and valproic acid) early after injury. After adjustments for initial injury level and severity, early exposure to non-gabapentinoid anticonvulsants was not associated with motor neurological outcomes (p = 0.38 for all anticonvulsants, p = 0.83 for sodium channel blockers, p = 0.82 in propensity-matched cohort).

CONCLUSION

Non-gabapentinoid anticonvulsant exposure was not associated with greater or lesser neurological recovery. This suggests that these medications, as administered for the acute management of spinal cord injury, do not impact long-term neurological outcomes.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
4 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Health Sciences > Pharmacology (medical)
Language:English
Date:May 2019
Deposited On:15 Jan 2020 13:40
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 12:38
Publisher:Adis International Ltd.
ISSN:1172-7047
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s40263-019-00622-6
PubMed ID:30949923

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library