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Roles of phosphoinositides and their binding proteins in parasitic protozoa


Cernikova, Lenka; Faso, Carmen; Hehl, Adrian B (2019). Roles of phosphoinositides and their binding proteins in parasitic protozoa. Trends in Parasitology, 35(12):996-1008.

Abstract

Phosphoinositides (or phosphatidylinositol phosphates, PIPs) are low-abundance membrane phospholipids that act, in conjunction with their binding partners, as important constitutive signals defining biochemical organelle identity as well as membrane trafficking and signal transduction at eukaryotic cellular membranes. In this review, we present roles for PIP residues and PIP-binding proteins in endocytosis and autophagy in protist parasites such as Trypanosoma brucei, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia lamblia. Molecular parasitologists with an interest in comparative cell and molecular biology of membrane trafficking in protist lineages beyond the phylum Apicomplexa, along with cell and molecular biologists generally interested in the diversification of membrane trafficking in eukaryotes, will hopefully find this review to be a useful resource.

Abstract

Phosphoinositides (or phosphatidylinositol phosphates, PIPs) are low-abundance membrane phospholipids that act, in conjunction with their binding partners, as important constitutive signals defining biochemical organelle identity as well as membrane trafficking and signal transduction at eukaryotic cellular membranes. In this review, we present roles for PIP residues and PIP-binding proteins in endocytosis and autophagy in protist parasites such as Trypanosoma brucei, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia lamblia. Molecular parasitologists with an interest in comparative cell and molecular biology of membrane trafficking in protist lineages beyond the phylum Apicomplexa, along with cell and molecular biologists generally interested in the diversification of membrane trafficking in eukaryotes, will hopefully find this review to be a useful resource.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Parasitology, Infectious Diseases, utophagy; endocytosis; lipid-binding domain; parasite; phosphoinositide
Language:English
Date:1 December 2019
Deposited On:07 Jan 2020 16:48
Last Modified:07 Jan 2020 16:49
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1471-4922
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2019.08.008
PubMed ID:31615721

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