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Baseline neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is associated with long-term T2D remission after metabolic surgery


Bonaventura, Aldo; Liberale, Luca; Carbone, Federico; Vecchié, Alessandra; Bonomi, Alice; Scopinaro, Nicola; Camerini, Giovanni Bruno; Papadia, Francesco Saverio; Maggi, Davide; Cordera, Renzo; Dallegri, Franco; Adami, Giovanni; Montecucco, Fabrizio (2019). Baseline neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is associated with long-term T2D remission after metabolic surgery. Acta Diabetologica, 56(7):741-748.

Abstract

AIMS

Metabolic surgery is considered as a therapeutic option for obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In order to identify novel laboratory variables that could improve the selection of patients who might greatly benefit from a surgical approach, we focused on the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as a predictor of long-term T2D remission following metabolic surgery.

METHODS

Thirty-one obese patients with T2D included in this pilot study underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) at the Surgical Department of Genoa University, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino in Genoa (Italy). Before surgery, serum samples were collected to evaluate blood count, glycemic profile, and circulating neutrophil degranulation products.

RESULTS

The median age was 56 years, median body mass index (BMI) was 32.37 kg/m$^{2}$, and median glycated hemoglobin was 8.4%. White blood cell count was in a range of normality, with a median NLR of 1.97. By a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, NLR has been found to be significantly associated with T2D remission at 1, 3, and 5 years and the best cutoff of ≤ 1.97 has been identified by Youden index. When comparing study groups according to NLR cutoff, those with NLR ≤ 1.97 were older and underwent more often BPD. By a logistic regression analysis, NLR ≤ 1.97 has been found to predict T2D remission across 5 years, irrespective of baseline BMI.

CONCLUSIONS

A baseline low NLR is associated with long-term T2D remission in obese patients undergoing metabolic surgery, suggesting that circulating inflammatory cells (i.e., neutrophils) might negatively impact on T2D remission.

Abstract

AIMS

Metabolic surgery is considered as a therapeutic option for obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In order to identify novel laboratory variables that could improve the selection of patients who might greatly benefit from a surgical approach, we focused on the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as a predictor of long-term T2D remission following metabolic surgery.

METHODS

Thirty-one obese patients with T2D included in this pilot study underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) at the Surgical Department of Genoa University, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino in Genoa (Italy). Before surgery, serum samples were collected to evaluate blood count, glycemic profile, and circulating neutrophil degranulation products.

RESULTS

The median age was 56 years, median body mass index (BMI) was 32.37 kg/m$^{2}$, and median glycated hemoglobin was 8.4%. White blood cell count was in a range of normality, with a median NLR of 1.97. By a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, NLR has been found to be significantly associated with T2D remission at 1, 3, and 5 years and the best cutoff of ≤ 1.97 has been identified by Youden index. When comparing study groups according to NLR cutoff, those with NLR ≤ 1.97 were older and underwent more often BPD. By a logistic regression analysis, NLR ≤ 1.97 has been found to predict T2D remission across 5 years, irrespective of baseline BMI.

CONCLUSIONS

A baseline low NLR is associated with long-term T2D remission in obese patients undergoing metabolic surgery, suggesting that circulating inflammatory cells (i.e., neutrophils) might negatively impact on T2D remission.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Molecular Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Internal Medicine
Health Sciences > Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Life Sciences > Endocrinology
Language:English
Date:July 2019
Deposited On:21 Jan 2020 14:29
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 12:54
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0940-5429
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00592-019-01345-2
PubMed ID:30993529

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