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Dopaminergic D1 Receptor Stimulation Affects Effort and Risk Preferences


Soutschek, Alexander; Gvozdanovic, Geraldine; Kozak, Rouba; Duvvuri, Sridhar; de Martinis, Nicholas; Harel, Brian; Gray, David L; Fehr, Ernst; Jetter, Alexander; Tobler, Philippe N (2020). Dopaminergic D1 Receptor Stimulation Affects Effort and Risk Preferences. Biological Psychiatry, 87(7):678-685.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Activation of D1 receptors has been related to successful goal-directed behavior, but it remains unclear whether D1 receptor activation causally tips the balance of weighing costs and benefits in humans. Here, we tested the impact of pharmacologically stimulated D1 receptors on sensitivity to risk, delay, and effort costs in economic choice and investigated whether D1 receptor stimulation would bias preferences toward options with increased costs in a cost-specific manner.

METHODS:
In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase 1 study, 120 healthy young volunteers received either placebo or 1 of 3 doses (6 mg, 15 mg, or 30 mg) of a novel, selective D1 agonist (PF-06412562). After drug administration, participants performed decision tasks measuring their preferences for risky, delayed, and effortful outcomes.

RESULTS:
Higher doses of the D1 agonist increased the willingness to exert physical effort for reward as well as reduced the preference for risky outcomes. We observed no effects on preferences for delayed rewards.

CONCLUSIONS:
The current results provide evidence that D1 receptor stimulation causally affects core aspects of cost-benefit decision making in humans.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Activation of D1 receptors has been related to successful goal-directed behavior, but it remains unclear whether D1 receptor activation causally tips the balance of weighing costs and benefits in humans. Here, we tested the impact of pharmacologically stimulated D1 receptors on sensitivity to risk, delay, and effort costs in economic choice and investigated whether D1 receptor stimulation would bias preferences toward options with increased costs in a cost-specific manner.

METHODS:
In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase 1 study, 120 healthy young volunteers received either placebo or 1 of 3 doses (6 mg, 15 mg, or 30 mg) of a novel, selective D1 agonist (PF-06412562). After drug administration, participants performed decision tasks measuring their preferences for risky, delayed, and effortful outcomes.

RESULTS:
Higher doses of the D1 agonist increased the willingness to exert physical effort for reward as well as reduced the preference for risky outcomes. We observed no effects on preferences for delayed rewards.

CONCLUSIONS:
The current results provide evidence that D1 receptor stimulation causally affects core aspects of cost-benefit decision making in humans.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Biological Psychiatry
Language:English
Date:1 April 2020
Deposited On:16 Jan 2020 12:20
Last Modified:10 Mar 2020 02:05
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0006-3223
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.09.002
PubMed ID:31668477
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100014_165884
  • : Project TitleThe role of dopamine in value-based decision making
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDCRSII5_177277
  • : Project TitleThe Foundations of Successful Financial Decision Making
  • : FunderFP7
  • : Grant ID219811
  • : Project TitleGENS - Genomic Approach to Study the Role of Bacterioplankton in the Sulfur Cycle
  • : FunderFP7
  • : Grant ID295642
  • : Project TitleFEP - Foundations of Economic Preferences

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Language: English
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Embargo till: 2020-09-12