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Integrative Metabolomic and Metallomic Analysis in a Case–Control Cohort With Parkinson’s Disease


Lucio, Marianna; Willkommen, Desiree; Schroeter, Michael; Sigaroudi, Ali; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Michalke, Bernhard (2019). Integrative Metabolomic and Metallomic Analysis in a Case–Control Cohort With Parkinson’s Disease. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 11:331.

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with a complex etiology. Several factors are known to contribute to the disease onset and its progression. However, the complete underlying mechanisms are still escaping our understanding. To evaluate possible correlations between metabolites and metallomic data, in this research, we combined a control study measured using two different platforms. For the different data sources, we applied a Block Sparse Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (Block-sPLS-DA) model that allows for proving their relation, which in turn uncovers alternative influencing factors that remain hidden otherwise. We found two groups of variables that trace a strong relationship between metallomic and metabolomic parameters for disease development. The results confirmed that the redox active metals iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) together with fatty acids are the major influencing factors for the PD. Additionally, the metabolic waste product p-cresol sulfate and the trace element nickel (Ni) showed up as potentially important factors in PD. In summary, the data integration of different types of measurements emphasized the results of both stand-alone measurements providing a new comprehensive set of information and interactions, on PD disease, between different variables sources.

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with a complex etiology. Several factors are known to contribute to the disease onset and its progression. However, the complete underlying mechanisms are still escaping our understanding. To evaluate possible correlations between metabolites and metallomic data, in this research, we combined a control study measured using two different platforms. For the different data sources, we applied a Block Sparse Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (Block-sPLS-DA) model that allows for proving their relation, which in turn uncovers alternative influencing factors that remain hidden otherwise. We found two groups of variables that trace a strong relationship between metallomic and metabolomic parameters for disease development. The results confirmed that the redox active metals iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) together with fatty acids are the major influencing factors for the PD. Additionally, the metabolic waste product p-cresol sulfate and the trace element nickel (Ni) showed up as potentially important factors in PD. In summary, the data integration of different types of measurements emphasized the results of both stand-alone measurements providing a new comprehensive set of information and interactions, on PD disease, between different variables sources.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Aging
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ageing, Cognitive Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:6 December 2019
Deposited On:16 Jan 2020 12:28
Last Modified:23 May 2024 01:44
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1663-4365
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2019.00331
PubMed ID:31866853
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)