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What's in a Name? Measuring Access to Social Activities with a Field Experiment


Dietl, Helmut; Nesseler, Cornel; Gomez Gonzalez, Carlos (2019). What's in a Name? Measuring Access to Social Activities with a Field Experiment. Palgrave Communications, 5:160.

Abstract

Today’s societies increasingly consist of members who migrated from other countries and regions, and their functioning depends heavily on integrating their diverse members. Interactions with the local population through social activities enhance integration. Despite its relevance, however, previous research has largely overlooked the role of the local population in social integration. This paper introduces an objective method for analyzing access to social activities. Switzerland includes diverse native groups, who differ in culture and language, and a high percentage of foreigners. Applications were sent by email to amateur Swiss football clubs, asking if it is possible to join a training session. The applications differed only in the contact name. Individuals with foreign names, as well as individuals with Swiss names from some other native groups, received significantly fewer responses. The findings are relevant for governing institutions and policy-makers. Researchers who study social integration may find the novel method used here of considerable interest.

Abstract

Today’s societies increasingly consist of members who migrated from other countries and regions, and their functioning depends heavily on integrating their diverse members. Interactions with the local population through social activities enhance integration. Despite its relevance, however, previous research has largely overlooked the role of the local population in social integration. This paper introduces an objective method for analyzing access to social activities. Switzerland includes diverse native groups, who differ in culture and language, and a high percentage of foreigners. Applications were sent by email to amateur Swiss football clubs, asking if it is possible to join a training session. The applications differed only in the contact name. Individuals with foreign names, as well as individuals with Swiss names from some other native groups, received significantly fewer responses. The findings are relevant for governing institutions and policy-makers. Researchers who study social integration may find the novel method used here of considerable interest.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > General Arts and Humanities
Social Sciences & Humanities > General Social Sciences
Social Sciences & Humanities > General Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > General Economics, Econometrics and Finance
Language:English
Date:17 December 2019
Deposited On:31 Jan 2020 13:03
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 13:08
Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan
ISSN:2055-1045
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-019-0372-0
Official URL:https://www.nature.com/articles/s41599-019-0372-0
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:18828

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