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Evaluation of dietary treatment and amino acid supplementation in organic acidurias and urea‐cycle disorders: On the basis of information from a European multicenter registry


Molema, Femke; Gleich, Florian; Burgard, Peter; et al; Baumgartner, M R (2019). Evaluation of dietary treatment and amino acid supplementation in organic acidurias and urea‐cycle disorders: On the basis of information from a European multicenter registry. Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease, 42(6):1162-1175.

Abstract

Organic acidurias (OAD) and urea-cycle disorders (UCD) are rare inherited disorders affecting amino acid and protein metabolism. As dietary practice varies widely, we assessed their long-term prescribed dietary treatment against published guideline and studied plasma amino acids levels. We analyzed data from the first visit recorded in the European registry and network for intoxication type metabolic diseases (E-IMD, Chafea no. 2010 12 01). In total, 271 methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) and propionic aciduria (PA) and 361 UCD patients were included. Median natural protein prescription was consistent with the recommended daily allowance (RDA), plasma L-valine (57%), and L-isoleucine (55%) levels in MMA and PA lay below reference ranges. Plasma levels were particularly low in patients who received amino acid mixtures (AAMs-OAD) and L-isoleucine:L-leucine:L-valine (BCAA) ratio was 1.0:3.0:3.2. In UCD patients, plasma L-valine, L-isoleucine, and L-leucine levels lay below reference ranges in 18%, 30%, and 31%, respectively. In symptomatic UCD patients who received AAM-UCD, the median natural protein prescription lay below RDA, while their L-valine and L-isoleucine levels and plasma BCAA ratios were comparable to those in patients who did not receive AAM-UCD. Notably, in patients with ornithine transcarbamylase syndrome (OTC-D), carbamylphosphate synthetase 1 syndrome (CPS1-D) and hyperammonemia-hyperornithinemia-homocitrullinemia (HHH) syndrome selective L-citrulline supplementation resulted in higher plasma L-arginine levels than selective L-arginine supplementation. In conclusion, while MMA and PA patients who received AAMs-OAD had very low BCAA levels and disturbed plasma BCAA ratios, AAMs-UCD seemed to help UCD patients obtain normal BCAA levels. In patients with OTC-D, CPS1-D, and HHH syndrome, selective L-citrulline seemed preferable to selective L-arginine supplementation.

Abstract

Organic acidurias (OAD) and urea-cycle disorders (UCD) are rare inherited disorders affecting amino acid and protein metabolism. As dietary practice varies widely, we assessed their long-term prescribed dietary treatment against published guideline and studied plasma amino acids levels. We analyzed data from the first visit recorded in the European registry and network for intoxication type metabolic diseases (E-IMD, Chafea no. 2010 12 01). In total, 271 methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) and propionic aciduria (PA) and 361 UCD patients were included. Median natural protein prescription was consistent with the recommended daily allowance (RDA), plasma L-valine (57%), and L-isoleucine (55%) levels in MMA and PA lay below reference ranges. Plasma levels were particularly low in patients who received amino acid mixtures (AAMs-OAD) and L-isoleucine:L-leucine:L-valine (BCAA) ratio was 1.0:3.0:3.2. In UCD patients, plasma L-valine, L-isoleucine, and L-leucine levels lay below reference ranges in 18%, 30%, and 31%, respectively. In symptomatic UCD patients who received AAM-UCD, the median natural protein prescription lay below RDA, while their L-valine and L-isoleucine levels and plasma BCAA ratios were comparable to those in patients who did not receive AAM-UCD. Notably, in patients with ornithine transcarbamylase syndrome (OTC-D), carbamylphosphate synthetase 1 syndrome (CPS1-D) and hyperammonemia-hyperornithinemia-homocitrullinemia (HHH) syndrome selective L-citrulline supplementation resulted in higher plasma L-arginine levels than selective L-arginine supplementation. In conclusion, while MMA and PA patients who received AAMs-OAD had very low BCAA levels and disturbed plasma BCAA ratios, AAMs-UCD seemed to help UCD patients obtain normal BCAA levels. In patients with OTC-D, CPS1-D, and HHH syndrome, selective L-citrulline seemed preferable to selective L-arginine supplementation.

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Additional indexing

Contributors:Additional individual contributors from E-IMD
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Genetics
Health Sciences > Genetics (clinical)
Language:English
Date:2019
Deposited On:03 Feb 2020 16:31
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 13:10
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0141-8955
OA Status:Hybrid
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jimd.12066
PubMed ID:30734935

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