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On the Slavic Word for ‘Morning’: *(j)u(s)tro


Wandl, Florian (2019). On the Slavic Word for ‘Morning’: *(j)u(s)tro. Scando-Slavica, 65(2):263-281.

Abstract

The history of the Slavic word for ‘morning’ constitutes an old problem of Slavic etymology. Forms such as OCS utro, Cr jȕtro, R утро, Cz jitro ‘morning’ as well as the adverb OCS zaustra ‘in the morning’, Bg зáстра etc. certainly continue the root PIE *h2eu̯s- ‘(morgens) hell werden’. Consequently, an explanation of the attested forms needs to account for the following three issues: (1) the loss of the root final sibilant in most of the Slavic forms; (2) the acute tone on the root syllable; (3) the presence of a word-initial glide j in some Slavic languages. The present article deals with these problems. By starting from a holokinetic r-stem both the loss of the root final sibilant as well as the acute tone on the root syllable are explained as resulting from contamination of different stem or root variants respectively. The occurrence of a word initial glide, on the other hand, is explained by a transfer within syntagmatic expressions. One of the advantages of the proposed scenario is that all the posited changes may be paralleled by developments elsewhere in Slavic or Indo-European.

Abstract

The history of the Slavic word for ‘morning’ constitutes an old problem of Slavic etymology. Forms such as OCS utro, Cr jȕtro, R утро, Cz jitro ‘morning’ as well as the adverb OCS zaustra ‘in the morning’, Bg зáстра etc. certainly continue the root PIE *h2eu̯s- ‘(morgens) hell werden’. Consequently, an explanation of the attested forms needs to account for the following three issues: (1) the loss of the root final sibilant in most of the Slavic forms; (2) the acute tone on the root syllable; (3) the presence of a word-initial glide j in some Slavic languages. The present article deals with these problems. By starting from a holokinetic r-stem both the loss of the root final sibilant as well as the acute tone on the root syllable are explained as resulting from contamination of different stem or root variants respectively. The occurrence of a word initial glide, on the other hand, is explained by a transfer within syntagmatic expressions. One of the advantages of the proposed scenario is that all the posited changes may be paralleled by developments elsewhere in Slavic or Indo-European.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Slavonic Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:490 Other languages
410 Linguistics
Uncontrolled Keywords:Language, Linguistics, Historical Linguistics, Indo-European studies, Slavonic studies, Etymology, Morphology, Phonology, Accentology
Language:English
Date:3 July 2019
Deposited On:04 Feb 2020 12:39
Last Modified:04 Feb 2020 12:39
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0080-6765
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/00806765.2019.1672096
Official URL:https://doi.org/10.1080/00806765.2019.1672096

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