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Intake of Processed Meat and Association with Sociodemographic and Lifestyle Factors in a Representative Sample of the Swiss Population


Sych, Janice; Kaelin, Ivo; Gerlach, Fabienne; Wróbel, Anna; Le, Thu; FitzGerald, Rex; Pestoni, Giulia; Faeh, David; Krieger, Jean-Philippe; Rohrmann, Sabine (2019). Intake of Processed Meat and Association with Sociodemographic and Lifestyle Factors in a Representative Sample of the Swiss Population. Nutrients, 11(11):E2556.

Abstract

Processed meat (PM) intake is associated with health risks, but data are lacking in Switzerland. Using national representative data from a recent menuCH Survey, we first aimed to quantify intake of PM and its subtypes, and second to investigate associations with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors by multivariable regression analysis. PM was consumed by 72% of the population, and mean daily intake was 42.7 g/day (standard error of the mean (SEM) 1.2 g/day), ranging considerably across PM subtypes: highest intake of sausages 18.1 g/day (SEM 0.7 g/day) and lowest of bacon 2.0 g/day (SEM 0.2 g/day). PM intake by women was 4.7 g/1000 kcal lower than men (95% confidence interval (CI): -6.7; -2.7) and 2.9 g/1000 kcal lower in the French- language region compared with the German region (95% CI: 2.4; 8.7). Among sociodemographic and lifestyle factors examined, BMI (obese vs. normal: 5.5 g/1000 kcal, 95% CI: 2.4; 8.7) and current smoking (vs. never smoked: 3.1 g/kcal, 95% CI: 0.6; 5.6) were independently associated with PM intake. The results are a first description of PM intake, separate from other meat types, and which identified associations with two unhealthy lifestyle factors in Switzerland. Such data will contribute to better nutritional recommendations and guidance for public health interventions.

Abstract

Processed meat (PM) intake is associated with health risks, but data are lacking in Switzerland. Using national representative data from a recent menuCH Survey, we first aimed to quantify intake of PM and its subtypes, and second to investigate associations with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors by multivariable regression analysis. PM was consumed by 72% of the population, and mean daily intake was 42.7 g/day (standard error of the mean (SEM) 1.2 g/day), ranging considerably across PM subtypes: highest intake of sausages 18.1 g/day (SEM 0.7 g/day) and lowest of bacon 2.0 g/day (SEM 0.2 g/day). PM intake by women was 4.7 g/1000 kcal lower than men (95% confidence interval (CI): -6.7; -2.7) and 2.9 g/1000 kcal lower in the French- language region compared with the German region (95% CI: 2.4; 8.7). Among sociodemographic and lifestyle factors examined, BMI (obese vs. normal: 5.5 g/1000 kcal, 95% CI: 2.4; 8.7) and current smoking (vs. never smoked: 3.1 g/kcal, 95% CI: 0.6; 5.6) were independently associated with PM intake. The results are a first description of PM intake, separate from other meat types, and which identified associations with two unhealthy lifestyle factors in Switzerland. Such data will contribute to better nutritional recommendations and guidance for public health interventions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:23 October 2019
Deposited On:15 Jan 2020 13:27
Last Modified:15 Jan 2020 13:34
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2072-6643
Additional Information:This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Assessment in Nutritional Epidemiology: Public Health Implications for Promoting Lifelong Health)
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112556
PubMed ID:31652799

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