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Health-related quality of life in long-term survivors with localised prostate cancer by therapy-Results from a population-based study


Adam, Salome; Koch-Gallenkamp, Lena; Bertram, Heike; Eberle, Andrea; Holleczek, Bernd; Pritzkuleit, Ron; Waldeyer-Sauerland, Mechthild; Waldmann, Annika; Zeissig, Sylke Ruth; Rohrmann, Sabine; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker (2019). Health-related quality of life in long-term survivors with localised prostate cancer by therapy-Results from a population-based study. European Journal of Cancer Care, 28(5):e13076.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE
Several therapies for localised prostate cancer (PC) are available; all yield similar survival rates. However, each therapy has significant side effects that can influence patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the long run.

METHODS
The study sample included 911 survivors with localised PC, 5-15 years post-diagnosis who were identified from the population-based CAESAR + study in Germany. HRQoL was assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-PR25 questionnaires. The association between type of therapy and HRQoL was assessed with multivariable linear regression and global F-test adjusting for age, time since diagnosis and comorbidities.

RESULTS
Overall, survivors treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiotherapy (RT) alone reported the best HRQoL and the lowest symptom burden. Conversely, survivors treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) (& RP/RT) or RP & RT (in combination) reported the worst HRQoL and the highest symptom burden. Significant differences among treatment groups in HRQoL were found for global health status (p = 0.041), social functioning (p = 0.007), urinary symptoms (p = 0.035), bowel symptoms (p = 0.017) and hormonal treatment-related symptoms (p < 0.001) among other symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS
Long-term localised PC survivors formerly treated with a combination of RP and RT or with ADT report poorer HRQoL and more symptoms than patients treated with either RP or RT alone.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE
Several therapies for localised prostate cancer (PC) are available; all yield similar survival rates. However, each therapy has significant side effects that can influence patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the long run.

METHODS
The study sample included 911 survivors with localised PC, 5-15 years post-diagnosis who were identified from the population-based CAESAR + study in Germany. HRQoL was assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-PR25 questionnaires. The association between type of therapy and HRQoL was assessed with multivariable linear regression and global F-test adjusting for age, time since diagnosis and comorbidities.

RESULTS
Overall, survivors treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiotherapy (RT) alone reported the best HRQoL and the lowest symptom burden. Conversely, survivors treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) (& RP/RT) or RP & RT (in combination) reported the worst HRQoL and the highest symptom burden. Significant differences among treatment groups in HRQoL were found for global health status (p = 0.041), social functioning (p = 0.007), urinary symptoms (p = 0.035), bowel symptoms (p = 0.017) and hormonal treatment-related symptoms (p < 0.001) among other symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS
Long-term localised PC survivors formerly treated with a combination of RP and RT or with ADT report poorer HRQoL and more symptoms than patients treated with either RP or RT alone.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Oncology
Language:English
Date:September 2019
Deposited On:15 Jan 2020 13:47
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 13:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0961-5423
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ecc.13076
PubMed ID:31050091

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