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Amylin and leptin interaction: role during pregnancy, lactation and neonatal development


Boyle, Christina N; Le Foll, Christelle (2019). Amylin and leptin interaction: role during pregnancy, lactation and neonatal development. Neuroscience:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Amylin is co-secreted with insulin by pancreatic β-cells in response to a meal and produced by neurons in discrete hypothalamic brain areas. Leptin is proportionally secreted by the adipose tissue. Both hormones control food intake and energy homeostasis post-weaning in rodents. While amylin's main site of action is located in the area postrema (AP) and leptin's is located in the mediobasal hypothalamus, both hormones can also influence the other's signaling pathway; amylin has been shown enhance hypothalamic leptin signaling, and amylin signaling in the AP may rely on functional leptin receptors to modulate its effects. These two hormones also play major roles during other life periods. During pregnancy, leptin levels rise as a result of an increase in fat depot resulting in gestational leptin-resistance to prepare the maternal body for the metabolic needs during fetal development. The role of amylin is far less studied during pregnancy and lactation, though amylin levels seem to be elevated during pregnancy relative to insulin. Whether amylin and leptin interact during pregnancy and lactation remains to be assessed. Lastly, during brain development, amylin and leptin are major regulators of cell birth during embryogenesis and act as neurotrophic factors in the neonatal period. This review will highlight the role of amylin and leptin, and their possible interaction, during these dynamic time periods of pregnancy, lactation, and early development.

Abstract

Amylin is co-secreted with insulin by pancreatic β-cells in response to a meal and produced by neurons in discrete hypothalamic brain areas. Leptin is proportionally secreted by the adipose tissue. Both hormones control food intake and energy homeostasis post-weaning in rodents. While amylin's main site of action is located in the area postrema (AP) and leptin's is located in the mediobasal hypothalamus, both hormones can also influence the other's signaling pathway; amylin has been shown enhance hypothalamic leptin signaling, and amylin signaling in the AP may rely on functional leptin receptors to modulate its effects. These two hormones also play major roles during other life periods. During pregnancy, leptin levels rise as a result of an increase in fat depot resulting in gestational leptin-resistance to prepare the maternal body for the metabolic needs during fetal development. The role of amylin is far less studied during pregnancy and lactation, though amylin levels seem to be elevated during pregnancy relative to insulin. Whether amylin and leptin interact during pregnancy and lactation remains to be assessed. Lastly, during brain development, amylin and leptin are major regulators of cell birth during embryogenesis and act as neurotrophic factors in the neonatal period. This review will highlight the role of amylin and leptin, and their possible interaction, during these dynamic time periods of pregnancy, lactation, and early development.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:amylin; development; hindbrain; hypothalamus; leptin; pregnancy
Language:English
Date:14 December 2019
Deposited On:28 Jan 2020 15:58
Last Modified:28 Jan 2020 15:58
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0306-4522
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2019.11.034
PubMed ID:31846753

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Content: Accepted Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 14 December 2020
Size: 821kB
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Embargo till: 2020-12-14