Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Prospective motion correction with NMR markers using only native sequence elements


Aranovitch, Alexander; Haeberlin, Maximilian; Gross, Simon; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Wilm, Bertram J; Brunner, David O; Schmid, Thomas; Luechinger, Roger; Pruessmann, Klaas P (2018). Prospective motion correction with NMR markers using only native sequence elements. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 79(4):2046-2056.

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a method of tracking active NMR markers that requires no alterations of common imaging sequences and can be used for prospective motion correction (PMC) in brain MRI.
Methods

Localization of NMR markers is achieved by acquiring short signal snippets in rapid succession and evaluating them jointly. To spatially encode the markers, snippets are timed such that signal phase is accrued during sequence intervals with suitably diverse gradient actuation. For motion tracking and PMC in brain imaging, the markers are mounted on a lightweight headset. PMC is then demonstrated with high‐resolution T2*‐ and T1‐weighted imaging sequences in the presence of instructed as well as residual unintentional head motion.
Results

With both unaltered sequences, motion tracking was achieved with precisions on the order of 10 µm and 0.01° and temporal resolution of 48 and 39 ms, respectively. On this basis, PMC improved image quality significantly throughout.
Conclusion

The proposed approach permits high‐precision motion tracking and PMC with standard imaging sequences. It does so without altering sequence design and thus overcomes a key hindrance to routine motion tracking with NMR markers. Magn Reson Med 79:2046–2057, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a method of tracking active NMR markers that requires no alterations of common imaging sequences and can be used for prospective motion correction (PMC) in brain MRI.
Methods

Localization of NMR markers is achieved by acquiring short signal snippets in rapid succession and evaluating them jointly. To spatially encode the markers, snippets are timed such that signal phase is accrued during sequence intervals with suitably diverse gradient actuation. For motion tracking and PMC in brain imaging, the markers are mounted on a lightweight headset. PMC is then demonstrated with high‐resolution T2*‐ and T1‐weighted imaging sequences in the presence of instructed as well as residual unintentional head motion.
Results

With both unaltered sequences, motion tracking was achieved with precisions on the order of 10 µm and 0.01° and temporal resolution of 48 and 39 ms, respectively. On this basis, PMC improved image quality significantly throughout.
Conclusion

The proposed approach permits high‐precision motion tracking and PMC with standard imaging sequences. It does so without altering sequence design and thus overcomes a key hindrance to routine motion tracking with NMR markers. Magn Reson Med 79:2046–2057, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
12 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 31 Jan 2020
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Imaging
Language:English
Date:1 April 2018
Deposited On:31 Jan 2020 14:36
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 13:35
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0740-3194
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.26877
PubMed ID:28840611

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members