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“A Success Story that Can Be Sold”?: A Case Study of Humanitarian Use of Drones


Wang, Ning (2019). “A Success Story that Can Be Sold”?: A Case Study of Humanitarian Use of Drones. In: 2019 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS), Medford, MA, USA, 15 November 2019 - 16 November 2019.

Abstract

Increasingly, humanitarian organizations across the globe have been implementing innovative technologies in their practice as they respond to the needs of communities affected by conflicts, disasters, and public health emergencies. However, technological innovation may intersect with moral values, norms, and commitments, and may challenge humanitarian imperatives. Through the examination of an empirical case study on drone mapping, this paper aims to explore three questions: (1) What are the dynamics between aid delivery and technological innovation in the humanitarian enterprise? (2) How are structural problems addressed in an environment in which technology is being portrayed as a force for change? (3) What moral responsibilities towards vulnerable populations should humanitarian stakeholders bear when introducing innovative technologies in humanitarian action. Discussion revolves around the ideology of “technological utopia”, and the normative role of technology in the aid sector – to make substantive impacts, or to produce “success stories”. In conclusion, a call for rigorous ethical analysis to help foster value sensitive humanitarian innovation (VSHI) is made.
Keywords - Humanitarian technology; community consent; technology assessment; data safety and security; regulation deficit; stakeholder accountability

Abstract

Increasingly, humanitarian organizations across the globe have been implementing innovative technologies in their practice as they respond to the needs of communities affected by conflicts, disasters, and public health emergencies. However, technological innovation may intersect with moral values, norms, and commitments, and may challenge humanitarian imperatives. Through the examination of an empirical case study on drone mapping, this paper aims to explore three questions: (1) What are the dynamics between aid delivery and technological innovation in the humanitarian enterprise? (2) How are structural problems addressed in an environment in which technology is being portrayed as a force for change? (3) What moral responsibilities towards vulnerable populations should humanitarian stakeholders bear when introducing innovative technologies in humanitarian action. Discussion revolves around the ideology of “technological utopia”, and the normative role of technology in the aid sector – to make substantive impacts, or to produce “success stories”. In conclusion, a call for rigorous ethical analysis to help foster value sensitive humanitarian innovation (VSHI) is made.
Keywords - Humanitarian technology; community consent; technology assessment; data safety and security; regulation deficit; stakeholder accountability

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Ethics and History of Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > General Engineering
Social Sciences & Humanities > General Social Sciences
Language:English
Event End Date:16 November 2019
Deposited On:23 Jan 2020 12:37
Last Modified:22 Apr 2020 22:41
Publisher:IEEE
ISBN:978-1-7281-5480-0
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/istas48451.2019.8938015

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