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Internet skills and why they matter


Hargittai, Eszter; Micheli, Marina (2019). Internet skills and why they matter. In: Graham, Mark; Dutton, William H.. Society and the Internet : how networks of information and communication are changing our lives. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 109-124.

Abstract

Given that the Internet is now ubiquitous in high-income nations, do Internet skills still matter? The authors of this chapter synthesize a body of research that shows how Internet skills, defined across ten dimensions, remain critical, especially as the technology becomes ever more significant and embedded into everyday life. Having the requisite skills to use the Internet and related social media is essential to avoid being excluded from key facets of society. This chapter demonstrates the need to build the study of skills into digital inequality scholarship that seeks to address concerns over online experiences tending to follow and reinforce socioeconomic inequalities. Complementing research by Quan-Haase, Zhang, Wellman, and Wang (Chapter 5, this volume), this chapter challenges stereotypes of young people being tech-savvy, showing that youth are not universally knowledgeable about digital tools and media.

Abstract

Given that the Internet is now ubiquitous in high-income nations, do Internet skills still matter? The authors of this chapter synthesize a body of research that shows how Internet skills, defined across ten dimensions, remain critical, especially as the technology becomes ever more significant and embedded into everyday life. Having the requisite skills to use the Internet and related social media is essential to avoid being excluded from key facets of society. This chapter demonstrates the need to build the study of skills into digital inequality scholarship that seeks to address concerns over online experiences tending to follow and reinforce socioeconomic inequalities. Complementing research by Quan-Haase, Zhang, Wellman, and Wang (Chapter 5, this volume), this chapter challenges stereotypes of young people being tech-savvy, showing that youth are not universally knowledgeable about digital tools and media.

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Item Type:Book Section, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Communication and Media Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:700 Arts
Uncontrolled Keywords:Internet skill, digital divide, digital inequality, algorithmic skill, credibility assessment, privacy, security, information overload
Language:English
Date:September 2019
Deposited On:05 Feb 2020 11:14
Last Modified:05 Feb 2020 11:47
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISBN:978-0-19-884349-8
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198843498.003.0007
Related URLs:https://www.recherche-portal.ch/permalink/f/1h21i27/ebi01_prod011463869 (Library Catalogue)

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