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Impact of specialized pediatric palliative care programs on communication and decision-making


Streuli, Jürg C; Widger, Kimberley; Medeiros, Christina; Zuniga-Villanueva, Gregorio; Trenholm, Madeline (2019). Impact of specialized pediatric palliative care programs on communication and decision-making. Patient education and counseling, 102(8):1404-1412.

Abstract

Objective
To summarize and analyze the impact of specialized pediatric palliative care (SPPC) programs on communication and decision-making for children with life-threatening conditions.
Methods
Our search strategy covered MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, CINAHL, Scopus, and Embase through September 2018.
Results
We reviewed 13 studies analyzing the impact of SPPC programs on communication and decision-making using a wide range of outcome indicators. Study quality was poor in 58% of included papers. SPPC programs improved communication and decision-making between families and healthcare professionals (HCPs), within and between families, and among HCPs.
Conclusion
SPPC programs generally support and improve communication and decision-making for children with life-threatening conditions, their families and associated HCPs. Families referred to an SPPC program had more discussions with HCPs on a broad variety of topics. However, data on communication with children, siblings, and other family members was scarce and of poor quality.
Practice implications
More research on SPPC program efficacy is needed from the perspective of the ill child, as well as about barriers to end-of-life discussions and the specific aspects of SPPC programs responsible for improving outcomes.

Abstract

Objective
To summarize and analyze the impact of specialized pediatric palliative care (SPPC) programs on communication and decision-making for children with life-threatening conditions.
Methods
Our search strategy covered MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, CINAHL, Scopus, and Embase through September 2018.
Results
We reviewed 13 studies analyzing the impact of SPPC programs on communication and decision-making using a wide range of outcome indicators. Study quality was poor in 58% of included papers. SPPC programs improved communication and decision-making between families and healthcare professionals (HCPs), within and between families, and among HCPs.
Conclusion
SPPC programs generally support and improve communication and decision-making for children with life-threatening conditions, their families and associated HCPs. Families referred to an SPPC program had more discussions with HCPs on a broad variety of topics. However, data on communication with children, siblings, and other family members was scarce and of poor quality.
Practice implications
More research on SPPC program efficacy is needed from the perspective of the ill child, as well as about barriers to end-of-life discussions and the specific aspects of SPPC programs responsible for improving outcomes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Ethics and History of Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 August 2019
Deposited On:07 Feb 2020 16:23
Last Modified:07 Feb 2020 16:23
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0738-3991
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2019.02.011
PubMed ID:30772117

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