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Bifurcation in the history of Uranus and Neptune: the role of giant impacts


Reinhardt, Christian; Chau, Alice; Stadel, Joachim; Helled, Ravit (2020). Bifurcation in the history of Uranus and Neptune: the role of giant impacts. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 492(4):5336-5353.

Abstract

Despite many similarities, there are significant observed differences between Uranus and Neptune: while Uranus is tilted and has a regular set of satellites, suggesting their accretion from a disk, Neptune’s moons are irregular and are captured objects. In addition, Neptune seems to have an internal heat source, while Uranus is in equilibrium with solar insulation. Finally, structure models based on gravity data suggest that Uranus is more centrally condensed than Neptune. We perform a large suite of high resolution SPH simulations to investigate whether these differences can be explained by giant impacts. For Uranus, we find that an oblique impact can tilt its spin axis and eject enough material to create a disk where the regular satellites are formed. Some of the disks are massive and extended enough, and consist of enough rocky material to explain the formation of Uranus’ regular satellites. For Neptune, we investigate whether a head-on collision could mix the interior, and lead to an adiabatic temperature profile, which may explain its larger flux and higher moment of inertia value. We find that massive and dense projectiles can penetrate towards the centre and deposit mass and energy in the deep interior, leading to a less centrally concentrated interior for Neptune. We conclude that the dichotomy between the ice giants can be explained by violent impacts after their formation.

Abstract

Despite many similarities, there are significant observed differences between Uranus and Neptune: while Uranus is tilted and has a regular set of satellites, suggesting their accretion from a disk, Neptune’s moons are irregular and are captured objects. In addition, Neptune seems to have an internal heat source, while Uranus is in equilibrium with solar insulation. Finally, structure models based on gravity data suggest that Uranus is more centrally condensed than Neptune. We perform a large suite of high resolution SPH simulations to investigate whether these differences can be explained by giant impacts. For Uranus, we find that an oblique impact can tilt its spin axis and eject enough material to create a disk where the regular satellites are formed. Some of the disks are massive and extended enough, and consist of enough rocky material to explain the formation of Uranus’ regular satellites. For Neptune, we investigate whether a head-on collision could mix the interior, and lead to an adiabatic temperature profile, which may explain its larger flux and higher moment of inertia value. We find that massive and dense projectiles can penetrate towards the centre and deposit mass and energy in the deep interior, leading to a less centrally concentrated interior for Neptune. We conclude that the dichotomy between the ice giants can be explained by violent impacts after their formation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute for Computational Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Uncontrolled Keywords:Space and Planetary Science, Astronomy and Astrophysics
Language:English
Date:22 November 2020
Deposited On:13 Feb 2020 16:00
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 13:44
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0035-8711
Additional Information:This article has been accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society © 2020 The Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stz3271

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